crosswind


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crosswind

[′krȯs‚wind]
(meteorology)
A wind which has a component directed perpendicularly to the course (or heading) of an exposed, moving object.

crosswind

crosswind
crosswind
i. A wind blowing at an angle to the course or to the runway direction.
ii. In the case of an airfield circuit, it refers to a path that is 90° to the takeoff and landing direction. The one that is 90° after takeoff is called the first crosswind, and the one 90° to the landing direction is called the base leg, or final crosswind.
References in periodicals archive ?
The crosswind profile used in the simulations is shown in Fig.
Crosswind stability is the result of complex interactions between aerodynamics, vehicle dynamics and the driver.
This paper addresses the problem of generating gusty crosswinds in wind tunnel experiments.
It was also identified that the approach to St Helena was likely to lead to aircraft encountering significant crosswinds and low-level turbulence on occasions, and advised that a mechanism for relaying accurate crosswind and tailwind information was required, for both pilots and air traffic control units.
In addition, it provides an objective measurement of a pilot's ability to land in a crosswind, scoring the approach, landing and rollout in their entirety and displaying the degree of yaw, amount of sideload and distance from centerline on touchdown.
It conducts specialist development engine testing including noise, crosswind, thrust reverse, cyclic and endurance testing on all current Rolls-Royce large engine types and employs nearly 50 people at the facility.
The crosswinds felt more pronounced than expected because of lateral-control issues, but the awesome E-6 rudder is a powerful barn door on your tail that will keep you tracking down centerline if you provide the input.
Crosswind systems rely on high-speed periodic motions of a tethered wing to obtain a much greater apparent wind speed than the absolute wind relative to the ground.
Say crosswind landings were never your thing and you find yourself with 30 knots right across the runway.
In general, pass shooting ranges are longer than decoy gunning, bringing the laws of gravity and crosswind drift into play.
In order to further improve the accuracy of the aforementioned weapons some initiatives have been taken, particularly those that promote the development of sights that are not only able to measure the distance from the target thanks to a laser rangefinder, but that are also able to evaluate the crosswind along the bullet path.