crosswind component


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crosswind component

crosswind componentclick for a larger image
A component of wind velocity 90° to the track, runway, or any other direction. It is equal to W/V (Wind velocity) × sine A, where A is the angle between W/V and the direction concerned.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
What appears to have happened is that the crosswind component (approximately 10-40 degrees) essentially allowed the applied spray to cut the angle and brought the aerosol cloud in contact with the first few bioassay cages and very little else.
Odds are that unless you deliberately pick your runway lined up as such, your crosswind component will be less than 90 degrees.
Some pilots employ the rule of thumb of adding one half the crosswind component to their normal approach and climb-out speeds.
The aircraft's demonstrated crosswind component was established by the manufacturer at 17 knots.
Winds are 30 degrees from the inbound, so crosswind component is 50 percent of total winds, or 7.5 knots.
Crosswinds, of course, are another matter; what are your personal limits and how do they compare with the airplane's maximum demonstrated crosswind component? If the runway is oneway--uphill, for instance--but the wind isn't cooperating, what will you do?
Crosswind component at 30 degrees off the runway is exactly 50 percent.
If you must operate in high winds, heed the rule: no significant crosswind component for you.
Drift, and the observable ground track on the scope, is a vector product of TAS and crosswind component. An aircraft climbing and holding runway heading at 240 knots in a 20-knot cross wind will drift about five degrees while an aircraft climbing at 120 knots from the same or parallel run way will drift about ten degrees.
For example, one landing accident I analyzed resulted in four fatalities while the pilot attempted to land in a crosswind exceeding the maximum crosswind component of that airplane.
For example, you may feel just fine wrestling a 172 down to a runway at or beyond its demonstrated crosswind component, but absolutely freak out at the first sign of rain on the windshield.
All too often, we emphasize developing the ability to land in crosswinds right up to the airplane's maximum or demonstrated crosswind component. That's all well and good, and using the crosswind component chart is a good way to teach the planning for this maneuver.