crown fire

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crown fire

[′krau̇n ‚fīr]
(forestry)
A forest fire burning primarily in the tops of trees and shrubs.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Slow recolonization of burned oak-juniper woodlands by Ashe juniper (Juniperus ashei): ten years of succession after crown fire.
Crown fires that are severe could lead to significant chemical changes in the mineral soils (Smithwick et al.
As for the flame height, it was emphasized that the maximum height is around 2 m, and that areas vulnerable to crown fires represent about 17%.
Lands At Risk of Ecological Change, by Historic Fire Regime (in millions of acres) Regime I Regime II Regime III 0-35 years; 0-35 years; 35-100+; surface fire crown fire mixed fire National Forest System lands Class 1: low risk 19.
Fines in the crown affect the risk of a crown fire progressing horizontally.
latifolia) has serotinous cones, regenerates well following crown fire, and requires exposed mineral soil for seed germination and seedling establishment; we therefore expected seedling density to be greatest in areas severely burned by crown fires (Table 1).
Crossdated cores from larger sand pine trees in the stand indicated ages from 60-80 yr; the site has not experienced crown fire for at least that period.
Crown fires are more likely when canopies are homogenous (Payette et al.
Crown fires -- among the most lethal forces in the forest -- occur when flames reach into the canopy and torch the leaves or needles on the uppermost branches.
A 'mature' period where the canopy was fully developed and sufficiently separated from the lower strata so that crown fires were rare, producing much slower and more easily suppressed fires.
Most homes are ignited by flying embers thrown as far as a mile and a half ahead of a crown fire, or ignite when the ground fire reaches brush and trees within 100 feet of the buildings.
These treetop blazes, or crown fires, spread rapidly by jumping from canopy to canopy.