crown-of-thorns


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crown-of-thorns

a thorny euphorbiaceous Madagascan shrub, Euphorbia milii var. splendens, cultivated as a hedging shrub or pot plant, having flowers with scarlet bracts
References in periodicals archive ?
This funding will enable us to protect live coral cover by expanding our crown-of-thorns starfish control program.
This allowed the team to see through the robot's cameras, verify every crown-of-thorns starfish it identified, and approve injections of the pests before they happened.
Enolva said the crown-of-thorns, also called as sea stars, prey on live coral and are capable of gorging on a square meter of coral per month.
It feeds on other molluscs and starfish, including the crown-of-thorns starfish.
He said tackling the problem of the large, poisonous and spiny crown-of-thorns starfish, which feast on coral polyps and can devastate reef cover, was under way.
Chemistry professor Daisuke Uemura told the 2000 International Chemical Congress of Pacific Basin Societies hosted by the American Chemical Society (ACS) that his team found that arachidonic acid and a-linolenic acid in sea urchins attract crown-of-thorns starfish.
Among the most popular are poinsettias, crotons, and crown-of-thorns.
This work was funded by the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority through the Crown-of-Thorns Starfish Research Committee.
The appearance of the crown-of-thorns starfish in the Verde Island Passage could cause great damage to the area's biodiversity, Jacob Meimban, head of the wildlife bureau's coastal marine management office, said.
These plants and their toxic parts include: English ivy (leaves and berries), Delphinium and foxglove (all parts), Hydrangea (all parts), oak (raw acorns), oleander (all parts), apple, plum and peach (leaves and seeds), privet (leaves and berries), azalea (all parts), bird-of-paradise (seeds and pods), columbine (seeds), chinaberry (all parts), crown-of-thorns and pencil tree (milky sap), euonymous (leaves, bark, seeds), holly (berries), daffodil, hyacinth, naked lady (bulbs) and pregnant onion (all parts).
The crown-of-thorns starfish made a big splash in the mid-1960s--and another in the early 1980s--when unusually large numbers of the species devastated live coral on Australia's Great Barrier Reef.
These reefs will be protected though enhanced compliance with zoning, crown-of-thorns starfish control, stewardship approaches to protecting key species such as herbivores and corals, and, in the future, implementing restoration actions, Dr Reichelt said.