crucible steel


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

crucible steel

[′krü·sə·bəl ‚stēl]
(metallurgy)
References in periodicals archive ?
By 1865, the company had provided the necessary 1,600 tons of crucible steel wire for the project, delivered within a tight 12 months.
The latter, which had been prominent since Defoe's day, had been greatly boosted by the availability of crucible steel.
It fits into a genre that includes autobiographies of workers such as Charles Walker's 1922 volume Steel: The Diary of a Furnace Worker and Englishman Harry Brearley's description of a life in the crucible steel industry, Knotted String: Autobiography of a Steel-Maker (1941).
Forsythe is retiring in accordance with his plan after 19 years with Cleveland-Cliffs and a 41-year career, which included 22 years with Sharon Steel, Crucible Steel, and Westinghouse after graduation from Washington and Jefferson College.
Before the Civil War, the nascent crucible steel industry in the United States provided little competition to the Sheffielders.
The company, which also trades as Taylorsteel and Crucible Steel, has eight sites in the West Midlands, the north of England and Ireland.
An AFS member, he also worked with Crucible Steel Castings, Cleveland; Larson Foundry, Grafton, Ohio; Consolidated Foundries and Manufacturing and Adirondak Steel Castings, Watervliet, New York.
A member of the Steel Founders' Society of America and a 60-year member of AFS, he also worked with Swedish Crucible Steel Co.
1750 - Benjamin Huntsman reinvents cast crucible steel process in England, a process that disappeared after first being developed in India.