Cruck

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Cruck

One of a pair of large curved structural timbers, forming the wall posts and roof rafters of timber-framed houses; they are joined at the top of the frame where they support a ridge beam.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

crutch, cruck

One of a pair of naturally curved timbers that rise from the outer walls to support the ridge beam, each crutch being called a blade, 4; joined at the top and connected by one or two tie beams, the resulting arched frame forming the unit in the framework of old English houses or farm buildings; pairs of crutches were placed at approximately equal intervals.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
TURN TO PAGE 6 Upset Bill Lawson, chairman of the Cruck Cottage Heritage Association.
Thankfully there is no real damage to the more historic cruck roof timbers.
Rhys Jones takes cuttings and, right, an old cruck barn made using black poplar
Another is that every building shown within was constructed using a modified cruck flame.
A PS13,000 re-thatching of Dumfriesshire's historic Cruck Cottage is to be marked with a free Christmas celebration on Sunday.
Christmas at the Cruck is open to the public from 1pm to 4pm and there will be live music, carol singing, mulled wine and mince pies in the unique building in Torthorald near Dumfries which is the only remaining example of its kind in the area.
In the other two bays the oak crucks curved over the single-storey hall, 20 feet wide and spacious enough to prevent the occupants from choking on the smoke from the fire.
The tuneful couple turned the 15th Century cruck house into their home and created a mini studio under its 500-year-old oak beams.
Cruck Cottage, Upton Magna, nr Shrewsbury, Shropshire, is for sale at pounds 290,000.
The original oak crucks and roof was raised and the roof re-thatched in wheat straw with gorse underthatch.
``Surprisingly each of the crucks and roof timbers carried carved letters and numbers, a sort of 18th century DIY instructions kit.''