crusade

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crusade

1. any of the military expeditions undertaken in the 11th, 12th, and 13th centuries by the Christian powers of Europe to recapture the Holy Land from the Muslims
2. (formerly) any holy war undertaken on behalf of a religious cause
www.medievalcrusades.com
www.fordham.edu/halsall/sbook.1k.html
References in periodicals archive ?
Housley argues that crusading was transformed, not terminated, in this period by political, military, and financial factors.
They open vistas on the impact of the crusading movement as perceived by contemporaries.
Cobb has produced a book that will be an immensely useful resource for scholars and students working on the crusading period, as well as for interested laypersons, providing a valuable counterbalance to the plethora of histories of the Crusades written from the European perspective.
Therefore, the book focuses succinctly on Muslim responses to the Crusades in the Levant during the "core" period of crusading (p.
The strength of this section lies in the application of Section I's five themes to the ways in which the two rulers used family and memory to understand their crusading heritage.
Day-to-day communications between crusading groups must have been nightmarish but chroniclers say little about it.
Jonathan Phillips' interesting article 'The Call of the Crusades' (November 2009) contrasts the Age of the Enlightenment's disparagement of crusading with the more positive view taken by the Victorians.
The crusading order of the Knights Templar is an essential part of every conspiracy theorist's playbook, and if you're looking for a mythical relic of the Christian past (the Spear of Destiny, the Holy Grail, the True Cross), chances are it fell into the hands of a (fictional) crusader.
Crusading Spirituality in the Holy Land and Iberia, c.
Bernard of Clairvaux, organizer of the second Crusade, preached violent words in his sermon, In Praise of the Crusading Templers: "A new sort of army has appeared.
These scholars are most noted for establishing the so-called "pluralist" school, which has expanded the definition of crusading well beyond expeditions to Jerusalem, including campaigns against Muslims in Spain, pagans on the Baltic, and heretics and papal enemies within Western Christendom.