cryogenic temperature

cryogenic temperature

[‚krī·ə′jen·ik ′tem·prə·chər]
(cryogenics)
A temperature within a few degrees of absolute zero.
References in periodicals archive ?
They have alarms, sensors, chips and circuit boards and you have to remember that, internally, there is a cryogenic temperature that is hundreds of degrees below Fahrenheit.
In addition, the hybrid model must work at cryogenic temperature. The 64kb hybrid static CMOS RAM has been discussed in [5]; the estimated power consumption of this hybrid logic is 20 mW for read and 53.7 mW for write operation.
The DC resistivity at cryogenic temperature (12-300 K) was measured by Vander Pauw four probe techniques (Vander Pauw, 1958) using a DC source meter (Keithley, Model 220) coupled with DC Multimeter (Keithley, Model 2182).
Lake Shore Cryotronics' 240 Series of sensor input modules offers precision in cryogenic temperature measurement.
In this book, authors Barron and Nellis present readers with the second edition of their comprehensive examination of the specific heat transfer problems that occur in the cryogenic temperature range where there are distinct differences from conventional heat transfer problems.
Sarangan, "High aspect ratio silver nanorod thin films grown at cryogenic temperature substrates," Journal of Nanoscience Letters, vol.
When the sample was held at this cryogenic temperature, the nuclear spins of about 37 percent of the ions - a typical benchmark to measure quantum coherence - remained in their superposition state for three hours.
And materials which are wonderfully compliant (giving an excellent seal) at ambient temperature, may be as unforgiving as rock at cryogenic temperature, or may become brittle and shatter.
In a meeting to SIASUN premises, the proposal for an automated laser welding production line was discussed, as well the first test weld samples to be qualified at 4K cryogenic temperatures. In parallel, ASIPP will collaborate with Institute of Physics and Chemistry (IPC) in Beijing to perform mechanical strength and fracture toughness at cryogenic temperature on welds and base material.
Using a special cryogenic temperature RTD, mass calculations are done with the latest density equations of state for liquid oxygen, nitrogen, argon and CO2.
Instead of relying on liquid nitrogen as most similar spectroscopes do, the germanium-based GeMini employs a small electromechanical cooler that allows the device to maintain cryogenic temperature. This cooler is based on the "Stirling cycle," in which a coolant absorbs heat at the compression stage of the process and then removes that heat to regulate the temperature.

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