cryptogam

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Related to cryptogamic: Cryptogamic plants

cryptogam,

in botany, term used to denote a plant that produces spores, as in algaealgae
[plural of Lat. alga=seaweed], a large and diverse group of primarily aquatic plantlike organisms. These organisms were previously classified as a primitive subkingdom of the plant kingdom, the thallophytes (plants that lack true roots, stems, leaves, and flowers).
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, fungiFungi
, kingdom of heterotrophic single-celled, multinucleated, or multicellular organisms, including yeasts, molds, and mushrooms. The organisms live as parasites, symbionts, or saprobes (see saprophyte).
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, mossesmoss,
any species of the class Bryopsida, in which the liverworts are sometimes included. Mosses and liverworts together comprise the division Bryophyta, the first green land plants to develop in the process of evolution.
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, and fernsfern,
any plant of the division Polypodiophyta. Fern species, numbering several thousand, are found throughout the world but are especially abundant in tropical rain forests. The ferns and their relatives (e.g.
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, but not seeds. The term cryptogam, from the Greek kryptos, meaning "hidden," and gamos, meaning "marriage," was coined by 19th-century botanists because the means of sexual reproduction in these plants was not then apparent. In contrast, in the seed plants the reproductive organs are easily seen; the seed plants have accordingly been termed phanerogams, from the Greek phaneros, meaning "visible."

cryptogam

[′krip·tə‚gam]
(botany)
An old term for nonflowering plants.

cryptogam

(in former plant classification schemes) any organism that does not produce seeds, including algae, fungi, mosses, and ferns
References in periodicals archive ?
Physical properties of the psammophile cryptogamic crust and their consequences to the water regime of sandy soils, north-western Negev Desert, Israel.
Cryptogamic soil crusts: recovery from grazing near Camp Floyd State Park, Utah, USA.
Consider the cyanobacterial crust (also known as cryptogamic crust) that accounts for three-quarters of the living ground cover on the Colorado Plateau.
Although Moab's popularity among mountain bikers is a boon to the town's economy, it's a potential threat to the surrounding fragile desert environment (particularly to cryptogamic soil, a black, mottled crust that holds soil in place and allows new plants to germinate).
Rather, they aim to protect tiny organisms that form a dark, knobby soil called cryptogamic crust.
1958--Phytosocioligy and ecology of cryptogamic epiphytes.
The closest monographic work is Cryptogamic Flora of Tierra del Fuego (Hassel de Menendez & Solari 1976) but unfortunately it only includes a few orders and families.
Together with fungi, bryophytes, algae and bacteria compose a cryptogamic cover responsible for the 7% of the net primary production of terrestrial vegetation.
2] on three properties, and in 2012 the three observed colonies (each in cryptogamic crust) occupied 61 [m.
The combination of tissue necrosis and cryptogamic attack results in plant rot, leading to very low productivity (Mariau, 1999).
Meanwhile, heavy armored vehicles are already tearing up the fragile cryptogamic crust that holds the desert soils in place: damage from the 1991 war has loosed new dunes that threaten to smother Kuwait City.