cryptojacking


Also found in: Medical, Financial.

cryptojacking

Using the processing power in a user's computer to do cryptocurrency mining while visiting a website. Operating in the background, the user is typically unaware it is happening. JavaScript code in the Web page enlists the visitor's computer to do the mining, and although it only lasts as long as the visitor is on the site, the mining time accumulates if there are thousands of visitors every day.

The website owner is generally not the culprit; rather, a third-party has compromised the site by installing the cryptojacking routine. However, no matter how the routine was inserted into the site, the only thing that is stolen from the user is CPU processing cycles. See cryptocurrency mining.
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References in periodicals archive ?
On the signing of the MoU, Kai Grunwitz, Senior Vice President EMEA at NTT Security, says: "Europol works on all aspects of cyber crime - from botnet takedown and spear phishing right through to cryptomining, cryptojacking and the dark web - and therefore relies on collaboration with private sector security specialists like NTT Security for enhanced strategic threat intelligence.
Ransomware, cryptojacking, and business email compromise attacks also took a massive toll on financial losses due to cyber breaches in 2018, according to research by the Internet Society's Online Trust Alliance.
More ransomware, cryptojacking and formjacking claims are among the causes, Aon said.
[18] "Now Cryptojacking Threatens Critical Infrastructure, Too," WIRED, February 12, 2018.
The allocation of the processing power is done without consent and knowledge of the device owner and the criminal's ability to deploy scripts on victim's devices indicates a successful Cryptojacking' is a cybercrime threat in which threat actor(s) obtains unauthorised computer resources to generate cryptocurrency.
Cryptojacking represents a significant amount of hostile activity, at times accounting for more detections than all other malware combined, hitting the technology and education sectors hardest.
Although ransomware (malicious software that blocks access to a system until a sum of money is paid) and cryptojacking (unauthorised use of someone else's computer to mine cryptocurrency) declined last year, according to the Symantec report, there's a (relatively) new threat in town: formjacking.
As sophistication and cost of ransomware, cryptojacking, and social engineering attacks increase, 50% of consumers remain clueless about these online threats.
Possible scenarios the report gives include cloud-native attacks targeting weak APIs or ungoverned API endpoints, expanded reconnaissance and exfiltration of data in cloud databases, and leverage of the cloud as a springboard for cloud-native man-in-the-middle attacks to launch cryptojacking or ransomware attacks.
Cryptojacking, the unauthorized use of others' computers to "mine" cryptocurrencies like bitcoin, has surpassed the use of ransomware as the top cybercrime.
Cryptojacking, DDoS and ransomware attacks are only a few examples of cyber crimes that are threatening the home IoT ecosystem.

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