cryptology

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cryptology

[krip′täl·ə·jē]
(communications)
The science of preparing messages in forms which are intended to be unintelligible to those not privy to the secrets of the form, and of deciphering such messages.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

cryptology

The study of cryptography and cryptanalysis.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

cryptology

The science of developing secret codes and/or the use of those codes in encryption systems. See cryptography.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cryptologists assigned to the newly formed Air Force Security Service (AFSS) complemented the basic crew of these reconnaissance flights monitoring Soviet voice communications.
Not until two years later in 1946 did American cryptologists at Arlington Hall Station begin to break into encrypted cable traffic from the Soviet missions in New York and Washington that would ultimately incriminate him.
People who study codes are known as cryptologists. Cryptologists must be very careful to keep the key to the code a secret.
NSA cryptologists (experts in secret code) can crack almost any code an enemy might use.
Perhaps it is a hoax of some type, though cryptologists reject this idea because the patterns of letters, words, and word lengths follow the normal power-law distributions displayed by all languages.
Disaster had overtaken the British at Dunkirk and cryptologists identified the planned invasion of England.
Polish cryptologists broke the Enigma code for the first time in 1932.
Many questions surrounded the oddly illustrated work, named for discoverer William Voynich, as cryptologists around the world worked to find a key.
Also in this section is a fascinating discussion of the long effort by Polish and British cryptologists to break the German Ultra codes, and what those accomplishments eventually meant to the Allied war effort.
The majority of responses railed against the agency for not soliciting the expertise of private sector cryptologists to help evaluate the options.
CID evolved to what it is today starting back in the 1960s when the first class of communications technicians, later called cryptologists, began to train at Corry Station.