Cryptomonadida

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Related to cryptomonad: Cryptophyta, phylum Cryptophyta

Cryptomonadida

[‚krip·tō·mə′näd·ə·də]
(biology)
An order of the class Phytamastigophorea considered to be protozoans by biologists and algae by botanists.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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were extremely selective, strongly preferring cryptomonads over other phytoplankton species.
Given that the rotifers were food limited, exploitative competition with Bosmina seems plausible because Bosmina ingests many of the same phytoplankton resources as rotifers, including small flagellates such as cryptomonads (DeMott and Kerfoot 1982).
The cryptomonad genome contains a short (4.9 kb) inverted repeat containing the rRNA cistrons, 30 tRNA genes, 44 genes encoding proteins for photosynthesis, 44 ribosomal protein genes (26 large subunit and 18 small subunit), 5 genes for biosynthetic function, 19 genes involved in gene expression (including 3 hypothetical chloroplast reading frames or ycfs), 25 additional ycfs, and 9 open reading frames (ORFs) larger than 50 amino acids.
The large ribosomal protein gene cluster of a cryptomonad plastid: gene organization, sequence and evolutionary implications.
Cryptomonad algae are evolutionary chimaera of two phylogenetically distinct unicellular eukaryotes.
This assemblage includes the extant cryptomonads, chlorarachniophytes, chromophytes, haptophytes, euglenoids, and dinoflagellates.
Since the nucleomorph genome of cryptomonads represents the vestigial nucleus of the host, it was suspected to contain these transferred genes.
The actual concentration of cryptomonads associated with the diapause response in natural systems probably will be very variable.
In addition, the differences o bserved for chrysophytes and cryptomonads were not significant, although Cryptomonas sp.
Presumably, diatoms and cryptomonads, which are richer in EPA than green algae, would even more readily complement a diet otherwise deficient in essential fatty acids.
Rotifer starvation times should allow survival of some species during short periods of low resource quantity or quality resulting from, for example, rapid fluctuations in the abundance of cryptomonads. In addition, diel vertical migration of rotifers (Magnien and Gilbert 1983), while limited relative to crustacean zooplankton, might expose rotifers to depths with low resource abundance for periods of several hours.