crystal laser

crystal laser

[¦krist·əl ′lā·zər]
(optics)
A laser that uses a pure crystal of ruby or other material for generating a coherent beam of output light.
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In comparison with earlier works, this one gathers all four possible scenarios and analyzes them in the wide range of the coupling coefficient values, extending the two-dimensional coupled-wave model for triangular lattice photonic crystal laser to describe threshold behavior of the TM-like modes.
Crystal: The most common near-IR crystal laser is neodynium YAG (Nd: YAG), which is a single-wavelength laser operating at 1.
One type of laser is a ruby crystal laser, shown in Figure 2, in which the pumped-up energy is concentrated on a ruby rod through the use of mirrors rather than waveguides.
The combining of our state-of-the-art fiber laser technology with PII's proprietary transition metal doped ZnS and ZnSe based crystal laser materials has opened exciting opportunities to build new perfect hybrid laser sources in the range 2 to 5 um for various applications.
In the United States, OLI's suppliers include VLOC, CVI, Positive Light, Crystal Laser and High Power Devices.
These awards were primarily awards for the technical and engineering accomplishments for being able to build the world's smallest portable crystal laser at an affordable price.
So even in those firms using the proven consultative selling process, their good work is often undone because order entry is unaware of special situations, or engineering's not in the loop on needed changes, or shipping packs the crystal laser in with the cast-iron stabilizer unit.
They cover nanoscale metallo-dielectric coherent light sources, optically pumped semiconductor photonic crystal lasers, electrically pumped photonic crystal lasers: laser diodes and quantum cascade lasers, photonic-crystal vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSEL), III-V compact lasers integrated onto silicon-on-insulator (SOI), semiconductor micro-ring, and nonlinearity in semiconductor micro-ring lasers.
Dr Damian Gardiner and co-researchers at the University of Cambridge (UK) have set up ilumink Ltd, a new company to further develop and commercialise the use of printed liquid crystal lasers for security printing and product authentication, a process he and colleagues developed for the university.
IPG describes its fiber laser technology as "disruptive" because it expects its lasers to capture market share from traditional gas and crystal lasers used in materials processing and because it believes its lasers will enable new applications for lasers.
Crystal lasers, often made with rubies, can produce a light strong enough to cut through steel.