crystalline semiconductor

crystalline semiconductor

A semiconductor that uses a silicon or gallium arsenide substrate composed of a single crystal. Its atomic structure is the same throughout the material. Contrast with amorphous semiconductor. See crystalline silicon.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Display may include an array of display pixels formed from liquid crystal display (LCD) components, an array of electrophoretic display pixels, an array of organic light-emitting diode display pixels, an array of pixels formed from crystalline semiconductor light-emitting diode dies (sometimes referred to as micro-LEDs), an array of electrowetting display pixels, or display pixels based on other display technologies,"
Abstract: Printed electronics technologies are being introduced as competitors to crystalline semiconductor technologies in several applications, including logic circuits, photovoltaic ceils and light-emitting diodes.
Chrzan and his colleagues found that when germanium tin nanocrystals were embedded within amorphous silica the nanocrystals formed a bilobed nanostructure that was half crystalline metallic and half crystalline semiconductor.
M., 'A Laser Ablation Method for the Synthesis of Crystalline Semiconductor Nanowires', Nature, London, 279:208-211, 1998.
Fauchet, "The effects of microcrystal size and shape on the one phonon Raman spectra of crystalline semiconductors," Solid State Communications, vol.
A cell must be thick enough to collect a sufficient amount of light, yet it needs to be thin enough to extract current.Physicists at Boston College found a way to resolve the "thick & thin" challenge through a nanoscale solar architecture based on the coaxial cable, a radio technology concept that dates back to the first trans-Atlantic communications lines laid in the mid 1800s."Many groups around the world are working on nanowire-type solar cells, most using crystalline semiconductors," said co-author Michael Naughton, a professor of physics at Boston College.
The key to the team's breakthrough was the ability to form crystalline semiconductors that nearly fill the inside diameter of glass capillaries.
Such 'resonant tunnelling diodes' have been extensively studied in highly ordered crystalline semiconductors such as gallium arsenide, and account for some of the highest-speed electronic devices ever demonstrated.
Today's flat-panel technology uses crystalline semiconductors that can't be bent easily.