centimeter

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centimeter

(sĕn`tĭmē'tər), abbr. cm, unit of length equal to 0.01 metermeter,
abbr. m, fundamental unit of length in the metric system. The meter was originally defined as 1/10,000,000 of the distance between the equator and either pole; however, the original survey was inaccurate and the meter was later defined simply as the distance between two
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, the basic unit of length in the metric systemmetric system,
system of weights and measures planned in France and adopted there in 1799; it has since been adopted by most of the technologically developed countries of the world.
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. The centimeter is the unit of length in the cgs systemcgs system,
system of units of measurement based on the metric system and having the centimeter of length, the gram of mass, and the second of time as its fundamental units. Other cgs units are the dyne of force and the erg of work or energy.
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. It is approximately equal to 0.39 inch, or 1 inch equals about 2.54 centimeters. See weights and measuresweights and measures,
units and standards for expressing the amount of some quantity, such as length, capacity, or weight; the science of measurement standards and methods is known as metrology.

Crude systems of weights and measures probably date from prehistoric times.
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The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

centimeter

[′sent·ə‚mēd·ər]
(mechanics)
A unit of length equal to 0.01 meter. Abbreviated cm.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

centimeter

In the metric system, a measure of length equal to a hundredth part of a meter, or 0.3937+ in.; abbreviated cm; an inch equals 2.54 cm.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

centimetre

(US), centimeter
one hundredth of a metre
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

centimeter

A unit of measurement that is 1/100th of a meter or approximately 4/10ths of an inch (0.39 inch).
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in periodicals archive ?
- up to 10,000 cubic centimeters - 28,000 manat plus eight manat for each cubic centimeter for an engine part with capacity of 8001-10000 cubic centimeters,
Those sediments, on average, hold around 1.5 million microorganisms per cubic centimeter, the researchers reported in the May 23 Science.
From January 1, 2018, customs duties for cars with an engine capacity of more than 1,500 cubic centimeters are calculated at $0.70 per cubic centimeter, and for used cars - $1.2.
Earlier, the customs duty on the import of new cars with an engine capacity of 1,500 cubic centimeters or more was $0.4 per each cubic centimeter, and for used cars $0.7 per each cubic centimeter.
Currently, the customs duty on the import of new cars with an engine capacity of 1,500 cubic centimeters or more is $0.4 per each cubic centimeter, and for used cars $0.7 per each cubic centimeter.
Twenty to 40 different species of phytoplankton--such as diatoms and algae--can coexist within a single cubic centimeter of water, all vying just for light and a handful of nutrients.
Some 300 of these particles, remnants of the Big Bang, course through every cubic centimeter of space at any moment.
One cubic centimeter of a new material can potentially hold as much information as 1,000 CD-ROMs, researchers announced last week.
Just before it collapses, the core of such a star may have a diameter of 3,000 kilometers, a temperature of a few billion kelvins, and a density of 10 billion grams per cubic centimeter. Afterwards, the core shrivels to a diameter of 30 km, the temperature climbs to 200 billion kelvins, and the density increases 10,000-fold.
Synnott, puts Charon's density at 1.30 grams per cubic centimeter (gm/cm3), with an uncertainty of 0.23 gm/cm3.
Scientists have created a diamond that packs in more atoms per cubic centimeter than any other material known to exist at atmospheric pressure.
Especially small cars with an engine size of between 1,500 cubic centimeters and 2,000 cubic centimeters fell sharply by 97.2 percent.