cubic yard


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cubic yard

In the US, the customary unit for measuring the volume of embankments, refuse, etc.; equivalent to the volume of a cube, each edge of which measures 3 feet; equals a volume of 0.765 cubic meters.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
3, the estimated cost savings to the producer is in the range of $3.98 per cubic yard. Disposal of fine CCA will still need to be managed.
An excellent material to add to your own compost, it costs $3 per 3-cubic-foot bag or around $20 per cubic yard (about 12 cents per square foot, 2 inches deep).
How did one of Wisconsin's largest home builders get named Environmentalist of the Year, keep 1,250 cubic yards (approx 624,000 pounds) of gypsum drywall out of landfills after less than a year, build soils and have the partnership of state regulatory authorities in this new recycling program?
Without question, there are piles of scrap material at larger yards and facilities that can best be moved and loaded by loaders with capacities of five cubic yards or more.
& Co., the Salem-based contractor managing the Oregon Avenue I-5 Overcrossing project, needed nearly 40,000 cubic yards of embankment materials to use beneath the four bridges and in widening the Spring field-Creswell Highway and I-5 interchange.
The woodchips are then sold to landscapers for $3.50 a cubic yard for use as ornamental mulch.
If that still doesn't bring in enough dirt, the county board signed off on a new deal that will allow the contractor building the course to draw from a borrow pit of up to 30,000 cubic yards of clean soil.
The $148,000 work will expand the 15,000-cubic-yard retention pond to 21,000 cubic yards to accommodate unusual storm events with excessive precipitation, airport spokesman Sean Briggs said.
Granite's scope of work includes demolition of over 80,000 cubic yards of existing portland cement concrete and asphalt surfaces, demolition of over 13,000 feet of existing utilities, over 350,000 cubic yards of mass grading, structural excavation and backfill, and installation of over 28,000 feet of new domestic and fire water, storm drain, sanitary sewer, and natural gas utilities, along with nearly 3,000 cubic yards of utility structures including the construction of five pump stations.
To date, about 2.5 million cubic yards of sediment contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have been removed.
The report, published July 16, said the 42 landfills in Illinois reported receiving more than 45 million gate cubic yards of waste in 2013.