cucumber mosaic virus


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cucumber mosaic virus

[¦kyü·kəm·bər mō¦zāik ′vī·rəs]
(virology)
The type species of the genus Cucumovirus. Abbreviated CMV.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
[15.] Thackray DJ, Jones RAC, Bwye AM, and BA Coutts Further studies on the effects of insecticides on aphid vector numbers and spread of cucumber mosaic virus in narrow-leafed lupins (Lupinus angustifolius).
Keywords: Banana, Chlorosis disease, Cucumber mosaic virus, ELISA detection, RT-PCR amplification
ATHE blotches are symptoms of cucumber mosaic virus, a serious disease spread by sap-feeding pests such as aphids.
You have described courgettes under attack from cucumber mosaic virus.
The plants can also host crop viruses, such as cucumber mosaic virus, potato leafroll virus, potato virus Y, tomato mosaic, or the potato fungus Alternaria solani.
Tomato is host for several viruses and attacked by tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), tobacco streak virus (TSV), tomato leaf curl virus (TLCV), tomato chlorosis virus (ToCV) and cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) etc.
Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV, genus: Cucumovirus, family: Bromoviridae) is one of the most widespread plant viruses in the world with extensive host range infecting about 1000 species including cereals, fruits, vegetables and ornamentals and its economic impact, CMV has been considered as one of the most important viruses (Roossinck, 1999; Palukaitis and Arenal, 2003).
Ding produced the first evidence for that hypothesis while working with Bob Symons in the Waite Institute in South Australia, studying cucumber mosaic virus, a devastating, aphid-carried disease that infects more than 1,000 plant species, including many important crops.
Transfer and expression of cucumber mosaic virus coat protein gene in the genome of Cucumis sativus.
When cucumber mosaic virus, known as CMV, infects garden-variety squash plants, the plants smell more alluring to aphids than healthy plants do, reported ecologist Kerry Mauck of Pennsylvania State University in University Park.