cue

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cue

1. (in the theatre, films, music, etc.) anything spoken or done that serves as a signal to an actor, musician, etc., to follow with specific lines or action
2. Psychol the part of any sensory pattern that is identified as the signal for a response
References in periodicals archive ?
Assume that sa is the cueing sensor and [s.sub.b] is the cued sensor.
A target was presented at the cued location (eccentric condition) or at the location 8.00[degrees] foveally offset from the cued location (foveal condition).
Therefore, allocation of attention through spatial cuing results in more accurate and faster processing of information in the space surrounding the cued region.
Consequently, if IOR is a bias against attention returning to a previously attended location, no IOR should be observed until attention leaves the cued location (Klein, 2000; Posner & Cohen, 1984).
Any differences between participants with high and low AQ scores in Experiments 1 and 2 would be especially interesting, since while we predict that low AQ participants would be cued very strongly towards faces by an eye-gaze cue, one might predict that high AQ participants would be strongly cued by an arrow towards tools.
An unexpected target, the nuclear weapon, was presented twice in each block of trials; it was never cued directly but was presented concurrently with a target object that was cued (once precisely and once imprecisely).
the cue in spatial cueing studies) is irrelevant to the task at hand (Jonides, 1981), and even, in many instances, when it is known that orienting attention to the cued location will be detrimental to performance (e.g.
The observer is susceptible to two types of errors: false alarms, labeled "errors of commission," in which cued nontargets are identified as targets; and misses, or "errors of omission," in which uncued targets are not detected (Mosier & Skitka, 1996; Skitka.
A Spatial Stroop task was used to explore whether the long lasting facilitation effect usually found in this task, as well as the typical reduction of Spatial Stroop interference on cued trials (Funes et al., 2003, 2005) is prevented by the presence of distractors.
However, only the risky beta shift, characteristic of complacency, will manifest in increasing false alarms on those occasions when the cuing is unreliable and a nontarget is cued.
The symbolic cueing effect is defined by faster responses to targets appearing in a validly cued location (e.g., a dot appearing on the pointed side of an arrow cue) than to targets appearing in an invalidly cued location (e.g., a dot appearing on the open side of an arrow).
In two experiments, participants viewed a virtual environment rendering of a far domain (mountainous topography) within which both cued and uncued military targets of either moderate or high importance were located (soldiers, tanks, mines, and high priority nuclear weapons).