cue

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cue

1. (in the theatre, films, music, etc.) anything spoken or done that serves as a signal to an actor, musician, etc., to follow with specific lines or action
2. Psychol the part of any sensory pattern that is identified as the signal for a response
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Attentional bias to threat information in anxious individuals has frequently been studied with three well-known paradigms: the emotional Stroop, the dot-probe, and the emotional spatial cuing tasks.
This easy-to-use task is a combination of two other tasks broadly used in attention studies, the cuing task (Posner, 1980) and the flanker task (Eriksen & Eriksen, 1974).
Students can apply all the techniques learned from playing four-voice chorales, especially the visual cuing strategies, in each of these new contexts.
Again, when familiarizing oneself with the notes, a process of visual cuing is extremely helpful, especially for those players who are not principally pianists.
Importantly, however, some manipulations can lead to a larger positive cuing effect at short SOAs (supposedly bigger capture), which is followed nevertheless by a larger IOR effect at longer SOAs (Milliken, Lupianez, Roberts, & Stevanovski, 2003), indicating that a greater attentional capture is not necessarily followed by a later appearance of IOR.
A second advantage of the head-up display is that it can present conformal information, such as the target cuing described earlier, as long as the head orientation is accurately known and the HMD coordinates of the cue reflect the momentary changes in head orientation, relative to the target environment.
One way to study reflexive attentional orienting empirically is the cuing paradigm introduced by Posner and colleagues (Posner 1980, Posner & Cohen, 1984).
(1999) that cuing a true target always helps in its detection, the cuing system could potentially lower detection performance levels (Nicoll, 1992).
This experiment seeks to examine the relationships among three advanced technology features (presentation of target cuing, reliability of target cuing, and level of image reality and the attention and trust given to that information).
screen-referenced) and target expectancy can modulate the effects of target cuing in directing attention for see-through helmet-mounted displays (HMDs).
Objects and their locations in exogenous cuing. Perception & Psychophysics, 63, 577-594.
Auditory 3D cuing benefits visual search performance because auditory 3D displays take advantage of the strengths of the auditory system relative to vision.