cultigen


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cultigen

[′kəl·tə·jən]
(biology)
A cultivated variety or species of organism for which there is no known wild ancestor. Also known as cultivar.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Significant differences were found among cultigens (F = 6.67, P < 0.001) for shoot tissue height, but no differences were found between the UV-B treatments or the interaction between the cultigen and UV-B radiation treatment (Table 1).
The hand movements of the coffee farmers used to carry out the project were similar to those used in the field in pruning, cutting, weeding, or nurturing their cultigens. It was extremely detailed work only possible to be carried out by trained and dexterous hands.
With one exception, components of galactogenic foods are plants, and most are cultigens. All are grown in the Nage region, although nowadays some are cultivated less often than formerly and are therefore less easily obtained.
We argue that rice has great antiquity in peninsular Malaysia but does not appear to have become a dominant cultigen in the south, except among Minangkabau, until the nineteenth century.
Among my family, there is an oral tradition that the peach is an aboriginal cultigen. My father recalled that when he was a boy, the peaches were so plentiful along the mountain roads that you could reach out and pick them while passing by on a wagon.
Wainimala River valley gardens did not look orderly or planned to the untrained observer, but there were reasons for the placement of every patch of every cultigen.(24)
Reinterpreting its symbolic and mythological value, Llosa links the iconography of the stone stelae to corn, the principal cultigen of formative American cultures.
However, unlike the better known Plains Village Pattern, these areas generally lack evidence for any cultigen other than maize and cultigens such as sunflowers, beans, squash, and tobacco.
Horticulturists term it a "cultigen," a plant that has actually evolved under cultivation, rather than in Mother Nature itself.
"The Native American agricultural legacy is more than a few hardy, tasty cultigen waiting to be 'cleaned up' genetically for consumers and then commercialized as novelty foods," he writes in Enduring Seeds (1989, Northpoint Press).
The term "cultigen" has been used to refer to domesticates in a broad sense, but has been employed in such different ways (Spencer, 1999; Spencer & Cross, 2007a, b) that its use can be confusing.
Therefore, we checked variability within cultigen to determine whether PI accessions were more variable than inbred cultivars.