cultigen

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cultigen

[′kəl·tə·jən]
(biology)
A cultivated variety or species of organism for which there is no known wild ancestor. Also known as cultivar.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Thus, the period from the Middle Woodland through the Mississippian demonstrated an overall change from foraging and horticulture of local cultigens to a dependence on maize agriculture in order to sustain the population.
At the same time, these shallow cultigens were more vulnerable to enhanced, westerly wind erosion, especially after AD 1650.
Increases in UV radiation can delay flowering and harvest times among different cultigens of bush beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) [13].
The hand movements of the coffee farmers used to carry out the project were similar to those used in the field in pruning, cutting, weeding, or nurturing their cultigens. It was extremely detailed work only possible to be carried out by trained and dexterous hands.
With one exception, components of galactogenic foods are plants, and most are cultigens. All are grown in the Nage region, although nowadays some are cultivated less often than formerly and are therefore less easily obtained.
The Pharmacologic, Ecologic and Social Implication of Using Non cultigens. Tucson, AZ: University of Arizona Press.
Columbian exchange: the role of analogue crops in the adoption and dissemination of exotic cultigens. In: GOODMAN, R.
NEW EVIDENCE ON THE USE OF INITIAL CULTIGENS BY THE HUNTER-GATHERER GROUPS OF THE ARCHAIC IV PERIOD AT EL PLOMO, ALTO MAIPO, CENTRAL CHILE
Interestingly, the researchers found a "nine-fold increase in total carotenoids provided within orange-red and yellow-orange colored cultigens versus yellow colored cultigens."
Land clearance and reclamation projects (e.g., frontier expansion, deforestation, the draining of lakes and marshes, terracing at higher elevations), the switch to early ripening varieties of rice, double-cropping, an increasing use of beancake fertilizer, the adoption of New World cultigens for more marginal soils (corn, peanuts, sweet potatoes), the expansion of textile handicrafts within the peasant household, widening circuits of commercial exchange--all these enhancements in overall production do not appear to have generated a proportional growth in the available surplus, as an accelerating population surge literally consumed the higher levels of output that were being attained through intensifications.