cultural deprivation

cultural deprivation

the lack of appropriate cultural resources, e.g. language and knowledge. The concept has been used to account for the educational limitations of working-class and ethnic minority children. It was particularly influential in the late 1960s and early 1970s, both in the US and the UK. The Headstart Project in the former and the Educational Priority Area Project in the latter were designed to compensate working-class children for lack of parental interest, the failings of home and neighbourhood, and the inadequate provision of appropriate cultural experience. This deficit theory of educational failure has been heavily criticized because it suggests personal inadequacy. Some sociologists believe that the issue is one of cultural difference: the idea that the school incorporates social values and ideas of social knowledge which are distinct from those held by members of the working class.
Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000
References in periodicals archive ?
But in recent decades it has been given an academic sheen, beginning with the cultural deprivation theory (also known as the "culture of poverty" argument) of the 1960s, which maintained that the low academic performance of racial and ethnic minorities stemmed from their deficient cultural practices (e.g., Bloom, Davis, & Hess, 1965).
Luisa May, Community Focused Schools co-ordinator at St John Lloyd Primary, said: "Trowbridge is an area of economic, social and cultural deprivation with a huge lack of cultural and artistic activities that the local community can engage with.
Those with cultural deprivation perform less well than those with cultural capital.
My genealogy reveals three key stages in the evolution of official discourses: exclusion (adult education as irrelevant for Inuit); cultural deprivation (adult education as a means for Inuit to overcome their collective deficiencies and thrive in the modern world); and the individualization of inadequacy (adult education as a means to meet the inherent learning needs of modern individuals).
Other social scientists have pointed to the persistence of 'cultural deprivation'.
While Raz emphasizes the importance of sensory and maternal deprivation theories, she is particularly concerned with cultural deprivation theory.
The following year, they published Compensatory Education for Cultural Deprivation, which contributed to the success of Head Start in arguing that "what is now required is not equality of access to education.
Although the Waxes acknowledged that Orata did not use the concept of cultural deprivation, they claimed his view was consistent with this theory and that the officials in the U.S.
The cultural deficit paradigm is also known by similar phrases such as cultural disadvantaged, cultural deficit, cultural deprivation theory, which posit that African Americans experience social dilemmas based primarily on their own internal failures.
Finally, the author challenges the common use of the theory of cultural deprivation to address issues of achievement gaps between ethnic minority children and their peers.
Ir is also a book I recommend for academicians who wish to use Tobar's stories to discuss cultural deprivation paradigms (Banks, 2002, p.
Members of minority communities are viewed from the cultural deprivation model (Ford & Grantham, 2003; Valencia, 1997), which asserts that problems are the result of inadequate cultural resources.

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