cultural geography


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cultural geography

[¦kəl·chər·əl jē′ag·rə·fē]
(anthropology)
References in periodicals archive ?
As an emerging subfield of cultural geography, critical toponymy explores new areas of spatial relationships between power, society, and landscape.
The topics are population; migration; race and ethnicity; urban geography; food and agriculture; manufacturing; services; development; cultural geography: folk and popular culture, language, and religion; political geography; and humans and the environment: pollution and climate change.
Miller's Nollywood Central recasts a cultural geography that places Hollywood at its center.
Organized topically, each chapter contains contemporary pop-culture articles such as the origins of the go-cup and the cultural geography of Louisiana radio stations.
This member will be an "architectural historian." A successful candidate will come from landscape architecture, real estate, construction, community development, urban planning, archeology, the legal field, cultural geography or related disciplines.
The ways in which white feminists (and older white women in particular) define feminism and have committed violent acts against Muslim women is a central component to how Muslim women are racialized and gendered as Other (see for instance, Carina Listorborn, "Geographies of the Veil: Violent Encounters in Urban Public Space in Malmo, Sweden," Social and Cultural Geography 16, 1 [2015]).
Their essay stands at a particularly fertile junction: one where what was initially called the "new cultural geography" emerged from encounters with new ideas and currents from across the arts and humanities.
Darke's work blends art, ecology, horticulture, and cultural geography in the creation, conservation, and management of broadly functional living landscapes.
There have been lively and thought-provoking debates on these ideas in social and cultural geography over the last few years, exploring what Gill Valentine has described as the 'implicit role of shared space in providing the opportunity for encounters between strangers' (2008: 323; see also Valentine and Sadgrove, 2014; Wilson, 2011, 2013).
A more critical examination of these images has enabled a dynamic engagement with landscapes in contemporary cultural geography. The landscape is not an objective image.
As a scholar, she is the author of literally hundreds of articles in the broad fields of cultural geography and social studies, the arts, gender, religion, and health, with versions of many of these in the popular press.

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