cumulus cloud

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Related to cumuliform: cumulus, stratiform, Cumuliform cloud

cumulus cloud

[′kyü·myə·ləs ‚klau̇d]
(meteorology)
A principal type of cloud in the form of individual, detached elements which are generally dense and possess sharp nonfibrous outlines; these elements develop vertically, appearing as rising mounds, domes, or towers, the upper parts of which often resemble a cauliflower.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thunderstorms always mean rain or snow, showers (SH), and cumuliform cloud types.
For example, the phrase "pendant from a cumuliform cloud" from the AMS may be a technically accurate and important part of the definition, but for purposes of hazard planning this detail may not be important.
Consider the precipitation types which are associated with an unstable air mass: showers and thunderstorms, which by definition fall from cumuliform clouds.
Just like in the case of Virginia and Florida, the warm sector is dominated mostly by tropical air, lots of cumuliform clouds, warm temperatures, and low densities.
And behind the front, if fresh cold air is crossing over warm terrain, it will produce lots of shallow cumuliform clouds, though there is enough large-scale subsidence where they tend to flatten out rather than grow into deep showers.
With a cold advection scenario, lift is stronger and cumuliform clouds are more likely to occur, with small areas of deep, intense icing.
This type of weather is not particularly dangerous, and with the air mass being unstable the result is cumuliform clouds, intense showery precipitation, and good visibility outside the rain or snow showers.
Some of the remaining 20 percent of these icing reports are due to convective icing in vertically-developed cumuliform clouds.
Even with a satellite weather receiver, staying clear of turbulent and potentially icy cumuliform clouds is a stretch when you can't see them (except when they're lit up by all that lightning).
The LCL approximates the bases of cumuliform clouds and is drawn on the Skew-T as a black, horizontal bar.
The rising air can produce cumuliform clouds, which can grow into cumulonimbus clouds under the right conditions.