cumuliform cloud


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Related to cumuliform cloud: cumulous, Cumulus Clouds, Cumulus congestus

cumuliform cloud

[′kyü·myə·lə‚fȯrm ‚klau̇d]
(meteorology)
A fundamental cloud type, showing vertical development in the form of rising mounds, domes, or towers.

cumuliform cloud

A convective cloud with vertical development, formed by rising air currents in unstable air. These clouds are cauliflower-like in appearance with appreciable vertical development and dome-shaped upper surface. Usually cumuliform clouds are separate and distinct from each other. They also have flat bases and rarely cover the entire sky. Precipitation from cumuliform clouds is usually of a showery nature. They are extremely turbulent and the best height to penetrate them is at two-thirds of the cloud height. See cumulus and cumulonimbus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Usually it depends on the availability of convective or cumuliform clouds," said Al Musallam.
Just like in the case of Virginia and Florida, the warm sector is dominated mostly by tropical air, lots of cumuliform clouds, warm temperatures, and low densities.
With a cold advection scenario, lift is stronger and cumuliform clouds are more likely to occur, with small areas of deep, intense icing.
This type of weather is not particularly dangerous, and with the air mass being unstable the result is cumuliform clouds, intense showery precipitation, and good visibility outside the rain or snow showers.
Some of the remaining 20 percent of these icing reports are due to convective icing in vertically-developed cumuliform clouds.
Even with a satellite weather receiver, staying clear of turbulent and potentially icy cumuliform clouds is a stretch when you can't see them (except when they're lit up by all that lightning).
The LCL approximates the bases of cumuliform clouds and is drawn on the Skew-T as a black, horizontal bar.
The rising air can produce cumuliform clouds, which can grow into cumulonimbus clouds under the right conditions.
Cumuliform clouds are formed through saturation due to adiabatic expansion (rising air), and don't follow the same rules with respect to the Skew T.
Any supercooled droplet over 40 microns in diameter for stratus clouds or 50 microns in diameter for cumuliform clouds is considered large and exceeds the certification standards for all ice protection systems.
Appleman's research applied to stratiform cold clouds only, but other research suggests that this may apply to cumuliform clouds as well.