cumulus cloud


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cumulus cloud

[′kyü·myə·ləs ‚klau̇d]
(meteorology)
A principal type of cloud in the form of individual, detached elements which are generally dense and possess sharp nonfibrous outlines; these elements develop vertically, appearing as rising mounds, domes, or towers, the upper parts of which often resemble a cauliflower.
References in periodicals archive ?
Moist air, containing water vapor, retains its heat and releases it that vapor condenses, usually into cumulus clouds. The heat of condensation--a corollary to evaporative cooling--adds heat energy that warms the air so it continues to rise, creating more lift, which results in more cooling and condensation.
For, though the droplets in a Cumulus cloud are extremely small, there are one hell of a lot of them.
Because of the typical positive buoyancies in cumulus clouds the in-cloud vertical velocities tend to be dominated by upward motions.
Shallow cumulus clouds play a large role in Earth's current radiation balance (e.g., Hartmann 2015), and their response to global warming makes a large and uncertain contribution to Earth's climate sensitivity (Bony and Dufresne 2005).
A single cumulus cloud may hold millions of tons of water, but it often won't part with a single drop of precipitation.
Tilt--Leaning cumulus or towering cumulus clouds suggests wind shear between the lower and upper troposphere, and possible severe weather.--TV
Q: What meteorological processes cause a single lone cumulus cloud to hang in an otherwise clear blue sky?
The scene consists of a blue sky, a Finnish flag (white and blue), and a cumulus cloud (white).
Occasionally, with clashing air currents inside the cumulus cloud, a serious downdraught is thrust by an even more serious updraught.
These products are designed to assist in identifying areas of increasing convective instability, pre-radar echo cumulus cloud growth preceding thunderstorm formation, storm updraft intensity, and potential storm severity derived from lightning trends.
Without convergence, there is no cumulus cloud and no rain!
A tornado is a violent, dangerous, rotating column of air that is in contact with both the surface of the earth and a cumulonimbus cloud or, in rare cases, the base of a cumulus cloud.