cuprous oxide

cuprous oxide

[′kyü·prəs ′äk‚sīd]
(inorganic chemistry)
Cu2O An oxide of copper found in nature as cuprite and formed on copper by heat; used chiefly as a pigment and as a fungicide. Also known as copper oxide.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Clinitest method detects reducing substances in urine by their conversion of cupric sulfate to cuprous oxide. This produces a color change in the sample, which is read visually against a chart to obtain the concentration of reducing substances present.
The resulting enriched cuprous oxide ([Cu.sub.2]O)-based organic conversion coating has provided improved physical strength and much greater acid resistance compared to the 100% cupric oxide (CuO) coatings (comprised of dendritic crystals), generated by the older black oxide processes.
The red coloration observed with cross-polarized light microscopy is consistent with the properties of cuprous oxide [Cu.sub.2]O.
Traditional organotin or cuprous oxide paints used to battle this fouling are effective, but toxic.
Carter, "Electronic structure of pure and doped cuprous oxide with copper vacancies: suppression of trap states," Chemistry of Materials, vol.
Of the concerned photocatalysts, cuprous oxide ([Cu.sub.2]O), a p-type semiconductor with a small direct band gap (1.9-2.2 eV), has been proved to be the most promising candidate for visible-light-driven photocatalytic decontamination [1-4].
This is traditionally achieved by the addition of cuprous oxide as a pigment, combined with organic co-biocides, in order to deliver the required biocide activity to fight off the entire span of marine-based biofouling organisms.
The most successful embodiment of this approach is the contact-leaching composition in which the cuprous oxide level is high and the soluble matrix is toughened with suitable co-resins (flexible, less soluble).
As a p-type semiconductor material, cuprous oxide ([Cu.sub.2]O) has been paid much attention owing to its fundamental significance and widespread potential applications in solar cells, gas sensors, Li-ion battery, and catalysis [1-5].
A large number use the inorganic compound cuprous oxide. Others include teflon, silicone coatings--such as Hempasil X3--polyurethane, and wax coatings that have limited negative impacts on the environment.