curate


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curate

1. a clergyman appointed to assist a parish priest
2. a clergyman who has the charge of a parish (curate-in-charge)
References in classic literature ?
The curate I left in the shed, but he came hurrying after me.
No sooner had the curate overtaken me than we saw either the fighting- machine we had seen before or another, far away across the meadows in the direction of Kew Lodge.
The curate, who was still timorous and restless, was now, oddly enough, for pushing on, and I was urging him to keep up his strength by eating when the thing happened that was to imprison us.
I was insensible for a long time, the curate told me, and when I came to we were in darkness again, and he, with a face wet, as I found afterwards, with blood from a cut forehead, was dabbing water over me.
In the meantime they were advancing toward the square, and the moment the coadjutor and the curate put their feet on the first church step the mendicant arose and proffered his brush.
He started on seeing the cavalier with the curate. The latter and the coadjutor touched the brush with the tips of their fingers and made the sign of the cross; the coadjutor threw a piece of money into the hat, which was on the ground.
"Maillard," began the curate, "this gentleman and I have come to talk with you a little."
"Yes," continued the curate, apparently accustomed to this tone, "yes, we wish to know your opinion of the events of to-day and what you have heard said by people going in and out of the church."
"Admirable and dogmatic!" repeated the curate, who, about as strong as D'Artagnan with respect to Latin, carefully watched the Jesuit in order to keep step with him, and repeated his words like an echo.
D'Artagnan began to be tired, and so did the curate.
"Exordium," repeated the curate, for the sake of saying something.
They did so, and the curate questioned the peasant at great length as to how he had found Don Quixote.