cure

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cure

1. a return to health, esp after specific treatment
2. any course of medical therapy, esp one proved effective in combating a disease
3. the spiritual and pastoral charge of a parish
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

cure

[kyu̇r]
(chemistry)
To change the properties of a resin material by chemical polycondensation or addition reactions.
(chemical engineering)
(engineering)
A process by which concrete is kept moist for its first week or month to provide enough water for the cement to harden. Also known as mature.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

cure

1. To change the physical properties of an adhesive or sealant by chemical reaction, which may be condensation, polymerization, or vulcanization; usually accomplished by the action of heat and catalyst, alone or in combination, with or without pressure.
2. For concrete, see curing.
3. To provide conditions conducive to the hydration process of stucco or portland cement.
4. To provide a sufficient quantity of water and to maintain the proper temperature within a plaster to ensure cement hydration.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
During pre-colonial times, healing was part of the economic, political and religious belief systems of the inhabitant's, ranging from persons of wisdom, diviners, rainmakers, circumcisers and curers. Plausibly, pre-colonial healers were to be found in practical every village and their practices were community based, and focused on preventive as well as curative methods.
Many ritual experts, such as the bomoh described here, emphasise that they are Islamic curers and harness only the power of ritual words from the Quran as their guide.
Some curers sprout lion's hair in the course of their possession by a lion spirit.
Because doctors and nurses are scarce in the Andes, traveling curers treat the sick In places where doctors refuse to live."
Not only, however, did such stories form a child's view of the supposed ignorance and superstition rampant throughout the mission lands, but they contributed to the formation of her understanding of the racial inferiority of dirty peoples with "skin as black as coal" and "eyes as brown as the mud in the village streets" and to the gendered roles that medical doctors (male curers) and nurses (female caretakers) should play in bringing scientific medicine to "heathen lands." As a missionary A-B-C exercise for primary children suggested, "D is for doctors, who for Jesus' sake / Make sick children well, curing many / an ache." But "N stands for nurses with caps clean and / white, / Filling the hearts of the sick with de- / light." (6)
Thus, as Sandos does point out, Franciscans may have been viewed as powerful shamans who required the same kind of appeasement afforded Native curers.
This isn't really for colds, but it contained peppermint and eucalyptus, which are both well-known cold curers. I added this oil to a burner with some water and waited until the children went to bed before relaxing in front of it.
Davies is described on the book cover as 'the last of the apprentice bacon curers', but his tales have an appeal which will reach far more people than those making a living out of meat.
Neil Clark, chairman of Aberdeen Fish Curers and Merchants Association, explained: "The Prince compared this year and last and said they couldn't have been more different.
In successive chapters we learn of "King, Court and Royal Officials," "The People and the Law," "The Scribe," "The Merchant," "The Warrior," "Marriage," "The Gods," "The Curers of Disease," "Death, Burial and the Afterlife," "Festivals and Rituals," "Myth," "The Capital," and "Links across the Wine-Dark Sea."
* Children need to be bonded to their curers and feel secure in their care (Belsky 1997, Seigel 2001).