Curiosity

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Curiosity

Anselmo
so assured of wife’s fidelity, asks friend to try to corrupt her; friend is successful. [Span. Lit.: Don Quixote]
Cupid and Psyche
her inquisitiveness almost drives him away forever. [Gk. Myth.: Espy, 27]
Curious George
inquisitive, mischievous monkey. [Children’s Lit.: Curious George]
Fatima
Bluebeard’s 7th and last wife; her inquisitiveness uncovers his murders. [Fr. Fairy Tale: Harvey, 97–98]
Faustus, Doctor
makes demonic compact to sate thirst for knowledge. [Br. Lit.: Doctor Faustus]
Harker, Jonathan
uncovers vampiric and lycanthropic activities at Castle Dracula. [Br. Lit.: Dracula]
Lot’s wife
ignores God’s command; turns to salt upon looking back. [O.T.: Genesis 19:26]
Lucius
his insatiable curiosity involves him in magic and his accidental transformation into an ass. [Rom. Lit.: The Golden Ass]
Nosy Parker
after a meddlesome Elizabethan Archbishop of Canterbury. [Br. Hist.: Espy, 169]
Odysseus’ companions
to determine its contents, they open the bag Aeolus had given Odysseus, thus releasing winds that blow the ship off course. [Gk. Lit.: Odyssey].
Pandora
inquisitively opens box of plagues given by Zeus. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 191]
Pry, Paul
overly inquisitive journalist. [Br. Lit.: Paul Pry; Espy, 135]
sycamore
symbolizes inquisitiveness. [Flower Symbolism: Flora Symbolica, 177]
Vathek
journeys to Istakhar where world’s secrets are revealed. [Br. Lit.: Vathek]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Dwarves--The Changing Lives of Archetypal 'Curiosities'--and Echoes of the Past." Disability Studies Quarterly 25.3 (Summer 2005).
Benedict's study nicely complements Marjorie Swann's recent Curiosities and Texts: The Culture of Collecting in Early Modern England (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2001), a work that focuses on more positive uses of curiosity and its employment in transcending boundaries between the elite and popular classes.
In Curiosities and Texts: The Culture of Collecting in Early Modern England, Marjorie Swann copes with the challenge by keeping a tight focus on the practice of collecting.