Cushing's syndrome

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Related to cushingoid: Cushing's syndrome

Cushing's syndrome

[′ku̇sh·iŋz ‚sin‚drōm]
(medicine)
A complex of symptoms including facial and truncal obesity, hypertension, edema, and osteoporosis, resulting from oversecretion of adrenocortical hormones.
References in periodicals archive ?
In our study, Group B patients treated with prednisolone led to Cushingoid appearance in 40% of patients.
All the patients presenting with cushingoid features and history of using nappy rash ointment who presented for the first time during the study period were included.
Cataracts Cushingoid appearance Diabetes Diaphoresis Easy bruising Hyperlipidemia Hypertension Increased appetite Impaired wound healing Increased incidence of malignancies Infections Leukopenia Mood lability [Na.
I've probably missed a lot because I failed to screen people, not recognizing that they had cushingoid features.
skin thinning and Cushingoid appearance) are often of great concern to RA patients, more debilitating serious toxicities, such as vertebral fractures and cataracts, may be initially unrecognized or asymptomatic.
We did not observe ECS secondary to small cell carcinoma of the lung probably because of lack of typical Cushingoid features, so these would have been missed by treating physicians and/or rapid downhill course prior to referral to our centre.
Dermatoiogical changes can occur with steroid therapy, including a redistribution of subcutaneous fat causing the cushingoid appearance of central obesity, hump back, and moon face.
Physical examination revealed a slightly cushingoid appearance and the patient was incontinent of urine.
Possible complications include fluid and electrolyte imbalance, muscle weakness and a loss of muscle mass, tendon rupture, osteoporosis, vertebral fractures, aseptic necrosis of the humeral and femoral heads, peptic ulcer, impaired wound healing, a cushingoid state, adrenocortical insufficiency, cataracts, and decreased carbohydrate tolerance.
In this case report we present a 64-year-old woman with a history of poorly controlled hypertension who subsequently developed Cushingoid features, hirsutism, hypokalemia, hypercortisolemia, increased serum testosterone levels, and diabetes mellitus.