cushioning effect


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cushioning effect

cushioning effect
Cushioning effect (in ground effect).
A temporary gain in lift and decrease in drag during flight near the ground or water caused by the compression of air between the wings of the aircraft and the surface below. Also called ground effect.
References in periodicals archive ?
Despite the cushioning effect of the currency appreciation, inflationary threat, though, persists, as international raw-material prices continue to advance relentlessly.
Cushioning - Ensure there is a cushioning effect when you sit down
Lane Clark said the position could have been even worse, because the IAS 19 accounting standard used for measuring pension liabilities on company balance sheets has had a cushioning effect.
But as the piston moves toward the head, the plug enters the counterbore, providing the cushioning effect.
These slide into the sole of the shoe offering a customised cushioning effect.
Also depending on the nature of the activity, synthetic surfaces can be installed with a shock absorbent subsystem in order to increase the cushioning effect experienced by the athlete.
The cushioning effect inherent with the bellows designs can replace external devices like springs, height or level compensators, and mechanical devices used to smooth the handling of uneven surfaces.
The C6 will also showcase Citroen's latest safety and security programme, while pioneering new standard features such as an active bonnet - in the event of a pedestrian impact, the lid automatically 'pops' up, to create cushioning effect between the engine and the bonnet.
In the event of a pedestrian impact, the new bonnet automatically springs up to create a cushioning effect between the engine and the bonnet itself.
Despite their rather slimy appearance, once IOd slipped them into my shoes they were quite pleasant I providing a cooling and cushioning effect on the balls of my feet.
These new cells then have a cushioning effect, lifting the wrinkle.