customary


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customary

1. Law
a. founded upon long continued practices and usage rather than law
b. (of land, esp a feudal estate) held by custom
2. 
a. a statement in writing of customary laws and practices
b. a body of such laws and customs
References in classic literature ?
Arnold was silently contemplating, for the last time, his customary prospects of banishment to the inn, when he became aware that Sir Patrick was making signs to him.
To all his grandiloquent account of the bald-headed chief and his countrymen, the Big Hearts of the East, his cousin listened with great attention, and replied in the customary style of Indian welcome.
The whole population appeared in the field, drawn up in lines, arrayed with the customary regard to rank and dignity.
We framed in our minds the usual resolution of thanks and admiration and gratitude, and took the first opportunity to vote it, and put it in writing and present it to the captain, with the customary speech.
When within a proper distance, he despatched an Indian runner, belonging to a friendly tribe, to announce the approach of himself and party, continuing his route at a deliberate pace, in order that the intelligence might, as was customary, precede his arrival.
When they entered the town, its inhabitants were seen collected in an open space, where they were arranged with the customary deference to age and rank.
I have just ordered an excellent dinner at the customary hour.
What will become of me if my master takes a fancy to be an archbishop and not an emperor, as is usual and customary with knights-errant?
Two days later, as the steamer Mariposa plied her customary route between Tahiti and San Francisco, the passengers ceased playing deck quoits, abandoned their card games in the smoker, their novels and deck chairs, and crowded the rail to stare at the small boat that skimmed to them across the sea before a light following breeze.
Humorous half-columns in the local papers, written in the customary silly way by unlicked cub reporters just out of grammar school, tickled the fancy of San Francisco for a fleeting moment in that the steamship Mariposa had rescued some sea-waifs possessed of a cock-and-bull story that not even the reporters believed.
Politics, literature, agriculture--the customary pursuits of a man in my position--had none of them the slightest attraction for me.
She crossed the room, on her way to my chair, with a less determined tread than was customary with her.