cut

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Related to cut both ways: stick with, at first, so much for

cut

1. Botany incised or divided
2. Veterinary science gelded or castrated
3. Economics a decrease in government finance in a particular department or area, usually leading to a reduction of services, staff numbers, etc.
4. short for power cut
5. Chiefly US and Canadian a quantity of timber cut during a specific time or operation
6. Sport the spin of a cut ball
7. Cricket a stroke made with the bat in a roughly horizontal position
8. Films an immediate transition from one shot to the next, brought about by splicing the two shots together
9. Chem a fraction obtained in distillation, as in oil refining
10. the metal removed in a single pass of a machine tool
11. 
a. the shape of the teeth of a file
b. their coarseness or fineness
12. Brit a stretch of water, esp a canal
13. make the cut Golf to better or equal the required score after two rounds in a strokeplay tournament, thus avoiding elimination from the final two rounds
14. miss the cut Golf to achieve a greater score after the first two rounds of a strokeplay tournament than that required to play in the remaining two rounds

Cut

 

a relief printing plate used for reproducing illustrations. Depending on the type of original being reproduced, either a linecut or halftone is made. Linecuts are made from an original consisting of lines, strokes, and solid backgrounds of uniform density (pen-and-ink drawings, engraved prints, sketches); halftones are made from an image with varying densities (photographs, watercolors, or oil paintings).

Cuts are made with wood, linoleum, zinc, brass, copper, or plastic. In making zinc cuts, which are the most widely used, the original is first photographed; using photomechanical methods, it is then transferred onto a zinc plate with a light-sensitive coating, after which the areas between the surfaces to be printed are deepened by chemical or electrochemical etching. Copper cuts are made by hand engraving or etching in a solution of ferric chloride. There is also a quick method, known as single-process etching, for making magnesium and zinc cuts with etching machines. Cuts are also made on electroengraving machines. One cut will print 40,000–50,000 copies.

REFERENCES

Geodakov, A. I. Tsinkografiia. Moscow, 1962.
Geodakov, A. I. Proizvodstvo klishe. Moscow, 1972.

cut

[kət]
(biochemistry)
A double-strand incision in a duplex deoxyribonucleic acid molecule.
(chemical engineering)
A fraction obtained by a separation process.
(crystallography)
A section of a crystal having two parallel major surfaces; cuts are specified by their orientation with respect to the axes of the natural crystal, such as X cut, Y cut, BT cut, and AT cut.
(graphic arts)
A photoengraving used in letterpress printing.
(lapidary)
The style in which a gem is cut, such as brilliant cut, single cut, or rose cut.
(mathematics)
A subset of a given set whose removal from the original set leaves a set that is not connected.
(metallurgy)
(mining engineering)
To intersect a vein or a working.
To excavate coal.
To shear one side of an entry or a crosscut by digging out the coal from floor to roof with a pick.
(cell and molecular biology)
A double-strand incision in a duplex deoxyribonucleic acid molecule.
(nucleonics)
The fraction that is removed as product or advanced to the next separative element in an isotope separation process.
(textiles)
The number of needles per inch in the cylinder or needle bed in a knitting frame.

cut

1. Excavated material.
2. The void resulting from the excavation of material.
3. The depth to which material is to be excavated to bring the surface to a predetermined grade.
4. In the theater, a long slot across the stage floor for the introduction or removal of scenery.

cut

i. To switch off an aircraft engine.
ii. To cut the gun. To close the throttle of an engine.
iii. In air navigation, the intersection of two lines of position; this is the smaller angle between these two lines.

CUT

cut

(1) Remove. Delete. See cut and paste.

(2) In a video or movie, a sharp transition from one scene to another.

(3) A Unix command that extracts data from a file based on its location within the file.
References in periodicals archive ?
He said respect cut both ways. From 1990 to 2004, 177 young people had killed themselves in prison.
And the law will cut both ways. If a company is rewarding employees for long service, it may have to justify this so that it doesn't look like it is discriminating against its younger members of staff.
But they cut both ways. If we are to go to war - and only a miracle will stop it now - the democratic countries who champion and cherish freedom, human rights and the sanctity of the law must show that Iraq has defied the United Nations and stockpiled its weapons of mass destruction.
The political implications of this theory can cut both ways. Wright and Ridley invoke it to support affirmative action: Since men's advancement is propelled by their greater lust for power, often unrelated to merit, women must be favored "not to redress prejudice but to redress human nature." Others, such as Wayne State University law professor Kingsley Browne, argue that in the light of the new Darwinian science, male dominance in the public sphere is natural.
These things can cut both ways. If an employer makes an economically solid business decision that you must go--well, there's the door.