cutoff

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cutoff

[′kət‚ȯf]
(aerospace engineering)
The shutting off of the propellant flow in a rocket, or the stopping of the combustion of the propellant.
(civil engineering)
A channel constructed to straighten a stream or to bypass large bends, thereby relieving an area normally subjected to flooding or channel erosion.
An impermeable wall, collar, or other structure placed beneath the base or within the abutments of a dam to prevent or reduce losses by seepage along otherwise smooth surfaces or through porous strata.
(electronics)
The minimum value of bias voltage, for a given combination of supply voltages, that just stops output current in an electron tube, transistor, or other active device.
(engineering)
A misfire in a round of shots because of severance of fuse owing to rock shear as adjacent charges explode.
The line on a plastic object formed by the meeting of the two halves of a compression mold. Also known as flash groove; pinch-off.
(geology)
A new, relatively short channel formed when a stream cuts through the neck of an oxbow or horseshoe bend.
(mechanical engineering)
The shutting off of the working fluid to an engine cylinder.
The time required for this process.
(mining engineering)
A quarryman's term for the direction along which the granite must be channeled, because it will not split.
The number of feet a bit may be used in a particular type of rock (as specified by the drill foreman).
Minimum percentage of mineral in an ore that can be mined profitably.
(physics)
Technique used when the contribution to the value of a physical quantity given by integration over a certain variable is absurd (in particular, when the contribution is infinite); involves cutting off the integral at some limit.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

cutoff

1. The prescribed elevation at which the top of a drive pile is cut.
2. A structure, such as a wall, intended to eliminate or reduce percolation through porous strata.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In our study, when the cut-off level was set at [greater than or equal to]5% or [greater than or equal to]1%, PD-L1 expression was higher in patients over 60 years.
However, we have previously demonstrated that f-calprotectin levels crossed proposed cut-off levels in only a minority of UC patients [28].
His study for distinguishing benign and malignant pelvic masses pre-operatively at RMI cut-off level of 200 had a sensitivity of 85.4% and a specificity of 96.9%5.
Lipase was considerably more sensitive than amylase above the cut-off level for ethanol-induced AP (91% v.
Also, a temporary cut-off level of 30% Fe is being used from 2013 up to the end of 2015.
The cut-off level accepted for the free-to-total PSA rate is 0.18.
The ROC analyses showed that the area under the ROC curve was 0.75 and the cut-off level of HbA1c which gave the maximum sensitivity and specificity was 5.2% (Figure 2).
It is clear that when the cut-off level of progesterone will be found higher, the detection of spontaneous abortion rate will increase.
A level of 1000mIU/L is a useful cut-off level for MRI screening.The most common finding was microadenoma followed by a macroadenoma.
Thirteen of the 15 studies used a troponin T or I level obtained within 72 hours of admission and a cut-off level of 0.1 ng/mL.
The ROC curve analysis is a graphic method which can be used to determine this optimal cut-off level. In addition, it is a precise and valid measure of diagnostic accuracy [21].