cutoff


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Related to cutoff: Cutoff frequency, Cutoff Date

cutoff

[′kət‚ȯf]
(aerospace engineering)
The shutting off of the propellant flow in a rocket, or the stopping of the combustion of the propellant.
(civil engineering)
A channel constructed to straighten a stream or to bypass large bends, thereby relieving an area normally subjected to flooding or channel erosion.
An impermeable wall, collar, or other structure placed beneath the base or within the abutments of a dam to prevent or reduce losses by seepage along otherwise smooth surfaces or through porous strata.
(electronics)
The minimum value of bias voltage, for a given combination of supply voltages, that just stops output current in an electron tube, transistor, or other active device.
(engineering)
A misfire in a round of shots because of severance of fuse owing to rock shear as adjacent charges explode.
The line on a plastic object formed by the meeting of the two halves of a compression mold. Also known as flash groove; pinch-off.
(geology)
A new, relatively short channel formed when a stream cuts through the neck of an oxbow or horseshoe bend.
(mechanical engineering)
The shutting off of the working fluid to an engine cylinder.
The time required for this process.
(mining engineering)
A quarryman's term for the direction along which the granite must be channeled, because it will not split.
The number of feet a bit may be used in a particular type of rock (as specified by the drill foreman).
Minimum percentage of mineral in an ore that can be mined profitably.
(physics)
Technique used when the contribution to the value of a physical quantity given by integration over a certain variable is absurd (in particular, when the contribution is infinite); involves cutting off the integral at some limit.

cutoff

1. The prescribed elevation at which the top of a drive pile is cut.
2. A structure, such as a wall, intended to eliminate or reduce percolation through porous strata.
References in periodicals archive ?
Two-screen programs with a similar screening cutoff for both screens risk missing infants with marginally elevated TSH concentrations, who need to be treated (5,6).
For cardiometabolic cutoffs of AHtR and BMI percentile, male sensitivity and accuracy were higher, while female specificity was higher.
Laboratory rounding led to a decrease in the proportion of patients potentially suitable for early discharge across all cutoff concentrations.
Each dam section was analyzed for different conditions, i.e., varying the cutoff depth, length of blanket and thickness of stilling basin.
Extra sensors were placed in each of the two checks (equidistantly before and after the cutoff location) to gather wetting-front advance data and assess the speed of the wetting front as it moved downfield.
(7) The meta-analysis reported on here, however, provides that guidance: Using an age-adjusted D-dimer cutoff improves the diagnostic accuracy of D-dimer screening in older adults.
Males and females, 96.1 and 96.0 percent, respectively, had a predicted probability meeting the minimum cutoff of 0.50, which decreased with increasing cutoff.
The cutoff values of visceral fat area and waist circumference for identifying subjects at risk for metabolic syndrome in elderly Korean: Ansan Geriatric (AGE) cohort study.
Establishment of an Hb[A.sub.lc], cutoff for prediabetes has been more challenging than that for diabetes because the relationship between the incidence of type 2 diabetes and Hb[A.sub.lc] below 6.5% is continual, with no clear threshold that is associated with an accelerated risk of diabetes or other morbidities.
Lowering the glycosylated hemoglobin cutoff for prediabetes may lead to less cost-effective preventive interventions, a study suggested.
The cut-off grade for resource tabulation was set at 0.83 g/mt, consistent with the cutoff grade used for previous Courageous Lake resource estimates (2007 and 2010).