cutoff

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cutoff

[′kət‚ȯf]
(aerospace engineering)
The shutting off of the propellant flow in a rocket, or the stopping of the combustion of the propellant.
(civil engineering)
A channel constructed to straighten a stream or to bypass large bends, thereby relieving an area normally subjected to flooding or channel erosion.
An impermeable wall, collar, or other structure placed beneath the base or within the abutments of a dam to prevent or reduce losses by seepage along otherwise smooth surfaces or through porous strata.
(electronics)
The minimum value of bias voltage, for a given combination of supply voltages, that just stops output current in an electron tube, transistor, or other active device.
(engineering)
A misfire in a round of shots because of severance of fuse owing to rock shear as adjacent charges explode.
The line on a plastic object formed by the meeting of the two halves of a compression mold. Also known as flash groove; pinch-off.
(geology)
A new, relatively short channel formed when a stream cuts through the neck of an oxbow or horseshoe bend.
(mechanical engineering)
The shutting off of the working fluid to an engine cylinder.
The time required for this process.
(mining engineering)
A quarryman's term for the direction along which the granite must be channeled, because it will not split.
The number of feet a bit may be used in a particular type of rock (as specified by the drill foreman).
Minimum percentage of mineral in an ore that can be mined profitably.
(physics)
Technique used when the contribution to the value of a physical quantity given by integration over a certain variable is absurd (in particular, when the contribution is infinite); involves cutting off the integral at some limit.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

cutoff

1. The prescribed elevation at which the top of a drive pile is cut.
2. A structure, such as a wall, intended to eliminate or reduce percolation through porous strata.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
To investigate the effect of part of these new guidelines, and especially the new cutoff values (ie, 3+ at 30%), we initiated a study of 150 invasive breast cancer specimens, interpreted by the FDA-approved HER2 FISH pharmDx assay (Dako) and the HercepTest, and scored by 7 different pathologists.
"I am unhappy to hear about 100 percent cutoff in one college.
Prevalence of Underweight, Overweight/Obesity and Obesity in adults ([greater than or equal to] 18 y) among Chinese Americans, Vietnamese Americans and Japanese Americans by Age, Gender and Ethnicity based on WHO Global BMI Cutoffs
For example, on a base hit to right field with a runner on first, the right-fielder's throw to third base is considered the most important aspect of the cutoff and relay.
Guskey reminds us that, even when complex statistical formulas are used in setting cutoff scores, their mathematical precision is not a substitute for sound professional judgment.
We determined the effects of filtering on elevation localization accuracy for signals presented in front of and behind the head by averaging the perceived elevation of signals presented from each elevation at the 0 [degrees] and 20 [degrees] and the 160 [degrees] and 180 [degrees] azimuths, respectively, for each low- and high-pass filter cutoff frequency.
At Shyam Lal College, the cutoff for BA (Programme) is down by ten percent and now stands at 78 per cent.
STOCKHOLM -- Use of a "rule-in" hemoglobin [A.sub.1c] cut point of 6.8% and a "rule-out" value of 5.8%, with glucose testing for individuals who fall in the middle of the diagnostic cutoff, was more accurate in diagnosing type 2 diabetes than was a single cutoff value of 6.5%.
Artists' cutoff times must also be followed, she said.
A retrospective cutoff analysis was performed to determine whether all group 2 cases (those identified only on the second screen) could be identified by a single screen.
Accordingly, the identification of sex-specific AHtR cutoffs in this study was consistent with prior research.
Clinical evidence supporting the use of sex-specific cutoffs is sparse and controversial.