cutter compensation

cutter compensation

[′kəd·ər ‚käm·pən′sā·shən]
(control systems)
The process of taking into account the difference in radius between a cutting tool and a programmed numerical control operation in order to achieve accuracy.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bickert says a potential constraint to the transition was that all-new milling programs might need to be written for the Fryer machines, including the right-angle head cutter compensation programs, which were essential.
Norton (mechanical engineering, Northeastern, Tufts and Worcester Polytechnic U.) provides students and manufacturers with the latest technologies and methods used in the manufacturing of cams such as translating and oscillating followers, cutter compensation, cam profile definition and residual vibration control.
Cutter compensation: Most programmers utilize a CAD/CAM system at some point in the programming process.
Designed to output 1/2 round dovetailed boxes, this CNC machine takes just three seconds to change over between sides and fronts/ backs, and offers the following features: drawer size flexibility and precision; cutter compensation; parts storage; no cams to wear; no special tools for partial tenon on non-standard sizes; individually replaceable spindles, and more.
The control has a host of features, such as 2 GB memory, look-ahead function, Ethernet interface, graphics, and 3D cutter compensation.
Dynamic tool offset, or "cutter compensation," is employed real-time, and an optional real-time pump control allows remote starting and stopping of the pump, dual pressure set points for hard-to-pierce materials, and unlimited data logging of every process parameter imaginable.
A post-processor receives this file and converts it into the specific machine tool instructions required to control the axis motion, tool changes, cutter compensation, coolant, and other auxiliary machine functions.
He also identified other things that help increase productivity, like being able set more than one base and tool jumps to fit his requirements, and being able to change cutter compensation on the fly.
When circle milling, we typically use or G3 (directional) command along with a G41 or G42 code (for the cutter compensation) and the I code to dictate the radius or circle size.
Outdated cutter compensation and acceleration algorithms can cause inaccurate parts, gouging, and overshooting leading to an increase in scrap parts.