cutting point

cutting point

[′kəd·iŋ ‚pȯint]
(design engineering)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The cylinders accelerate and decelerate during each revolution such that the peripheral speed of the blades and the speed of the web are equal at the cutting point, which the company says will maintain sheet length accuracy and squareness.
Edge quality for thicker, denser materials may display a typical "raised edge," surface coatings may be disrupted, and tearing or splitting may propagate from the cutting point. Safety is a constant problem--exposed razors and their handling during replacement produces frequent accidents.
Forged metal dies are typically used in the "heat-assisted" die-cutting mode--i.e., the die initially contacts the PET sheet at low pressure and waits while heat is conducted from base plate to the cutting point. Heat softens the sheet and makes cutting easier.
Secondary finishing of technical parts is often slowed down by the relative inaccessibility of external cutting points. He cites examples of automotive ducting, washer bottles, seating, and fuel filler pipes as well as appliance, furniture, and toy moldings.
Although the ASI has no classification system (i.e., no normative scores or clinical cutting points) for distinguishing those who have alcohol or other drug abuse or dependence problems from those who do not, it provides substantial information about the individual that can be used to make an assessment.