cutting waste

cutting waste

The waste of materials that occurs as a result of the difference in size between that which is required for a construction job and that which is usually commercially available.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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While announcing his presidential bid in June 2015, Trump said he would "save Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security without cuts." He added that it was "not fair" to make cuts to a program that people had been paying into for many years, and that he would save it "by making us rich again" and cutting waste, fraud and abuse.
Fritz Walleczek, managing director of corporate responsibility at Aldi UK, said: "Cutting waste is part of Aldi's DNA and we have a longstanding commitment to minimise our impact on the environment.
In its "manifesto" for cutting waste, the company said: "Weighing ...
A new facility in the city of North Salt Lake will convert food waste into natural gas and fertilizer, creating what Utah's governor said is a "win-win" for cutting waste and methane emissions at landfills while powering communities.
Noting that the wine industry produces around 13 million tons of organic waste per year, most of which must be disposed at a cost to the winery, the researchers expect that the new process could help improve access to renewable fuels while cutting waste management expenses.
The committee underlined the importance of cutting waste in public departments, reducing the deficit of the state-owned Electricite du Liban and increasing the working hours of civil servants.
Mr Harbour said: "At a time when we are cutting waste from the EU Budget, the region's 900 million growth pot is extremely welcome.
They're showing that when the money is tight, you don't have to automatically cut frontline services - you can get more bang for your buck by being innovative and cutting waste.
Asked what kind of measures the government would take, the senior official told reporters: "It mainly has to do with cutting waste and re-organising the public sector." In the first draft of next year's budget, GDP is seen at around 232 billion euros ($316.4 billion) next year, meaning cuts of 2 percent would amount to around 4.5 billion euros.
I'm more than a little sceptical that the pounds 20bn cost efficiencies can be delivered solely by cutting waste.