cyanine dye


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cyanine dye

[′sī·ə·nən ‚dī]
(organic chemistry)
C29H35N2I Green metallic crystals, soluble in water; unstable to light, the dye is used in the photography industry as a chemical sensitizer for film. Also known as iodocyanin; quinoline blue.
References in periodicals archive ?
Blakeburn, "New cyanine dye overcomes current dye drawbacks," Chemical Science, vol.
Weiss, "A study of the binding of cyanine dyes to colloidal quantum dots using spectral signatures of dye aggregation," Journal of Physical Chemistry C, vol.
Cyanine dyes are widely used as fluorescent probes for visualization of nucleic acids in electrophoretic gels.
Further noting information is less accessible regarding the dye type used in DVD recordable media, the study says it is believed DVD-R media use a modified form of stabilized cyanine dye for the recording layer.
Media using cyanine dye performed well when exposed to light but had problems when under temperature/humidity stress conditions.
Standard sensitizers in DSCs can be divided into organometallic (polypyridyl complexes of ruthenium and osmium, metal porphyrin, and phthalocyanine), organic (cyanine dye, D-[pi]-A) and inorganic (quantum dots) dyes.
Previously, an activated cyanine dye (Cy-5), which can be readily coupled with peptide, proteins, and amino-linked oligonucleotides [9], was synthesized.
Despite of the unclear mechanism of the cyanine dyes' specific accumulation and retention, some researches have illustrated that the implications of EPR effect, organic-anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs), and mitochondrial membrane potential might have some relation [19, 20].
Harrison, WJ, Buonenrani, L, "Silica Nanoparticles Encapsulating Near-Infrared Emissive Cyanine Dyes." J.
The fluorophores for NIR imaging had been typically limited to the general class of cyanine dyes such as indocyanine green.
To assess the stability of the cyanine dyes relative to the instrument stability, a homogeneous fluorescent material, SRM 2242, was incorporated into the study.
We have studied the antioxidation effects of various compounds, such as the triterpene celastrol (Sassa et al., 1990, 1994), the bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid cepharanthine (Kogure et al., 1999), the xanthophyll astaxanthine (Goto et al., 2001), the pungent ingredient of red pepper known as capsaicin (Kogure et al., 2002) and artificial pigment cyanine dyes (Kogure et al., 1998), in order to develop antioxidants for medical use.