cyanosis

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cyanosis

(sī'ənō`sĭs), bluish coloration of the skin, mucous membranes, and nailbeds, resulting from a lack of oxygenated hemoglobin in the blood. It is a symptom of many disorders, including various pulmonary and heart diseases and many congenital heart defects (see blue babyblue baby,
infant born with a congenital heart defect that causes a bluish coloration of the skin as a result of cyanosis (deoxygenated blood). The color is most noticeable around the lips and at the tips of the fingers and toes.
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). Cyanosis that is caused by slowed circulation through peripheral blood vessels results in a bluish tinge only on the cool portions of the body (fingertips, nose, ears). In such cases the capillary blood gives up more than normal amounts of oxygen. Although this type of cyanosis can be caused by reduced cardiac output (e.g., in congestive heart failure), the most common causes are nervous tension and exposure to cold. Another type of cyanosis results from poisoning, either by nitrates in contaminated food or water or by certain chemicals and drugs.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Cyanosis

 

in medicine, a bluish violet discoloration of the skin and mucous membranes that occurs with human diseases accompanied by circulatory and respiratory disorders.


Cyanosis

 

a bluish discoloration of the skin and mucous membranes. The condition ranges in coloration from gray-blue to black-blue (“cast iron”). Cyanosis is due to an increase in the concentration (more than 5 g percent) of reduced hemoglobin, which has a bluish coloration, in capillary blood. Intense cyanosis of the extremities is called acrocyanosis. A distinction is made between central cyanosis, which results from a disturbance of oxygen saturation of blood in the lungs, and peripheral cyanosis, which results from a slowing of the blood flow and from extensive oxygen extraction into the surrounding tissues. Central cyanosis is observed mainly in pulmonary diseases, congenital heart diseases, and poisonings by carbon dioxide and aniline derivatives. Peripheral cyanosis is seen in heart diseases caused by circulatory disturbances and conditions such as thrombophlebitis and Raynaud’s disease in which a local slowing of blood flow occurs. False cyanosis is caused by a change in the color of the skin itself.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

cyanosis

[‚sī·ə′nō·səs]
(medicine)
A bluish coloration in the skin and mucous membranes due to deficient levels of oxygen in the blood.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

cyanosis

Pathol a bluish-purple discoloration of skin and mucous membranes usually resulting from a deficiency of oxygen in the blood
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
She was very active afebrile moderately cyanosed and well- hydrated with no obvious abnormality.
Perhaps it will give the slowly re-awakening cyanosed corpse of a city a heartbeat and lifeblood.
A total of 44.8% (n=22) patients presented in 1st week with significant p-value<0.05 and 37% patients were severely cyanosed with oxygen saturation <50%.
Therefore, neonates with bilateral choanal atresia used to exhibit a recurrent change in oxygenation, became cyanosed during quiet periods, and returned their normal colour when they cried.
We received the patient in dehydrated and cyanosed state with severe respiratory distress, acute abdomen and shock.
O/E--Patient is moderately built, Dyspnoeic and tachypnoeic, not cyanosed.
He was centrally cyanosed and his chest examination was remarkable for decreased air entry diffusely, prolonged expiratory phase and expiratory wheezes.
"I felt for a pulse quickly, there was none, they were both badly cyanosed and they needed attempted resuscitation immediately."
Resuscitation requirements BBAs, * Controls, p-value n (%) ([dagger]) n (%) General appearance 0.130 Stable 112 (88.9) 92 (81.4) Ill 8 (6.3) 7 (6.1) Cyanosed 6 (4.8) 14 (12.3) Early intervention 17 (12.6) 51 (42.9) Face-mask oxygen 3 (17.6) 21 (41.1) <0.0001 Nasal prongs oxygen 5 (29.4) 8 (15.7) 0.393 Intubation 2 (11.8) 4 (7.8) 0.423 Suction 8 (47.1) 45 (88.2) <0.0001 Warming 9 (53.0) 5 (9.8) 0.302 BBAs = babies born beforat hospital.
On examination, the boy was anxious, pale and cyanosed with marked respiratory distress.
* Child stops breathing in expiration, becomes rapidly cyanosed, then limp and subsequently loses consciousness