cyanosis


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cyanosis

(sī'ənō`sĭs), bluish coloration of the skin, mucous membranes, and nailbeds, resulting from a lack of oxygenated hemoglobin in the blood. It is a symptom of many disorders, including various pulmonary and heart diseases and many congenital heart defects (see blue babyblue baby,
infant born with a congenital heart defect that causes a bluish coloration of the skin as a result of cyanosis (deoxygenated blood). The color is most noticeable around the lips and at the tips of the fingers and toes.
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). Cyanosis that is caused by slowed circulation through peripheral blood vessels results in a bluish tinge only on the cool portions of the body (fingertips, nose, ears). In such cases the capillary blood gives up more than normal amounts of oxygen. Although this type of cyanosis can be caused by reduced cardiac output (e.g., in congestive heart failure), the most common causes are nervous tension and exposure to cold. Another type of cyanosis results from poisoning, either by nitrates in contaminated food or water or by certain chemicals and drugs.

Cyanosis

 

in medicine, a bluish violet discoloration of the skin and mucous membranes that occurs with human diseases accompanied by circulatory and respiratory disorders.


Cyanosis

 

a bluish discoloration of the skin and mucous membranes. The condition ranges in coloration from gray-blue to black-blue (“cast iron”). Cyanosis is due to an increase in the concentration (more than 5 g percent) of reduced hemoglobin, which has a bluish coloration, in capillary blood. Intense cyanosis of the extremities is called acrocyanosis. A distinction is made between central cyanosis, which results from a disturbance of oxygen saturation of blood in the lungs, and peripheral cyanosis, which results from a slowing of the blood flow and from extensive oxygen extraction into the surrounding tissues. Central cyanosis is observed mainly in pulmonary diseases, congenital heart diseases, and poisonings by carbon dioxide and aniline derivatives. Peripheral cyanosis is seen in heart diseases caused by circulatory disturbances and conditions such as thrombophlebitis and Raynaud’s disease in which a local slowing of blood flow occurs. False cyanosis is caused by a change in the color of the skin itself.

cyanosis

[‚sī·ə′nō·səs]
(medicine)
A bluish coloration in the skin and mucous membranes due to deficient levels of oxygen in the blood.

cyanosis

Pathol a bluish-purple discoloration of skin and mucous membranes usually resulting from a deficiency of oxygen in the blood
References in periodicals archive ?
Dyspnea on exertion was the most common presenting symptom (n=119) followed by cyanosis (n=41).
Finally, heart and liver conditions that limit efficient blood circulation may cause cyanosis of the combs due to reduction in the volume of blood passing through the lungs and reaching the peripheral tissues.To prevent comb cyanosis, farmers should house their chickens well, feed them well and carry out all the required vaccinations.
In contrast in cyanotic heart disease, bluish discoloration was present in almost all patients with signs of tachypnea and cyanosis (Table1-4).
On persistent history, patient denies history of exertional dyspnoea, on retrospective history-patient gave history of exposure to pesticides (Bifenthrin, cartap hydrochloride, kasugamycin, cypermethrin) used in agricultural field for the past 7 years, no family history of cyanosis, patient suspected to have haemoglobinopathies and evaluated further.
Swelling and cyanosis of the tongue associated with use of a laryngeal mask airway.
Most of these children were admitted to the hospital within 24 hours of developing fever, with peripheral cyanosis and cold extremities.
No pallor, icterus, cyanosis, oedema, clubbing was seen.
A rapid reduction in blood flow across the right ventricular outlet could be one of several explanations for the isolated symptom of cyanosis observed in this case.
All these cardiovascular alterations can lead to a more or less evident cyanosis with potential effects favoring the development of chromaffin cell alterations.
Her referral indication from the Ekiti State University Teaching Hospital (EKSUTH) by Dr Fatunla, had said 'cyanosis since infancy, recurrent squatting and breathlessness.'
She had perioral cyanosis, mild hypertelorism, high palate, and minor anomaly in her toe.