cyanosis

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Related to cyanotic: Cyanotic heart disease

cyanosis

(sī'ənō`sĭs), bluish coloration of the skin, mucous membranes, and nailbeds, resulting from a lack of oxygenated hemoglobin in the blood. It is a symptom of many disorders, including various pulmonary and heart diseases and many congenital heart defects (see blue babyblue baby,
infant born with a congenital heart defect that causes a bluish coloration of the skin as a result of cyanosis (deoxygenated blood). The color is most noticeable around the lips and at the tips of the fingers and toes.
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). Cyanosis that is caused by slowed circulation through peripheral blood vessels results in a bluish tinge only on the cool portions of the body (fingertips, nose, ears). In such cases the capillary blood gives up more than normal amounts of oxygen. Although this type of cyanosis can be caused by reduced cardiac output (e.g., in congestive heart failure), the most common causes are nervous tension and exposure to cold. Another type of cyanosis results from poisoning, either by nitrates in contaminated food or water or by certain chemicals and drugs.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Cyanosis

 

in medicine, a bluish violet discoloration of the skin and mucous membranes that occurs with human diseases accompanied by circulatory and respiratory disorders.


Cyanosis

 

a bluish discoloration of the skin and mucous membranes. The condition ranges in coloration from gray-blue to black-blue (“cast iron”). Cyanosis is due to an increase in the concentration (more than 5 g percent) of reduced hemoglobin, which has a bluish coloration, in capillary blood. Intense cyanosis of the extremities is called acrocyanosis. A distinction is made between central cyanosis, which results from a disturbance of oxygen saturation of blood in the lungs, and peripheral cyanosis, which results from a slowing of the blood flow and from extensive oxygen extraction into the surrounding tissues. Central cyanosis is observed mainly in pulmonary diseases, congenital heart diseases, and poisonings by carbon dioxide and aniline derivatives. Peripheral cyanosis is seen in heart diseases caused by circulatory disturbances and conditions such as thrombophlebitis and Raynaud’s disease in which a local slowing of blood flow occurs. False cyanosis is caused by a change in the color of the skin itself.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

cyanosis

[‚sī·ə′nō·səs]
(medicine)
A bluish coloration in the skin and mucous membranes due to deficient levels of oxygen in the blood.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

cyanosis

Pathol a bluish-purple discoloration of skin and mucous membranes usually resulting from a deficiency of oxygen in the blood
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Majority of the patients were of acyanotic CHD (n=114, 57%) while 86 (43%) patients had cyanotic heart disease including Eisenmenger disease.
Of the children with CHD, the spectrum of conditions in our study is similar to that from other parts of Nigeria,[2],[3],[4],[10],[14] Africa, and the world,[6],[18],[19] with VSD and TOF being the most common acyanotic and cyanotic heart lesions.
Heart murmur may also be absent especially in cyanotic CHD and the clinical features of CHD may overlap with those of other illness.14
Most cases of cyanotic congenital heart disease in the literature had concomitant Eisenmenger's syndrome (ES), which in itself increases the risks of the pregnancy.
It was found that the total score of QoL dimension and the scores of emotional well-being and self-esteem were significantly lower in the children with cyanotic CHD.
In cyanotic BHS spells, increased sympathetic activity occurs, whereas in pallid BHS spells, increased parasympathetic activity is seen as an autonomic regulation disorder (22).
'It was suspected that in patients with cyanotic heart disease, the low oxygen levels might lead directly to the growth of pheochromocytomas,' said Dr.
The American Academy of Pediatrics has included children with HS cyanotic CHD and acyanotic CHD, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, and prematurity in the high risk group for RSV infection, extended the age limit to 2 years, and recommended RSV prophylaxis (14).
This article has highlighted some of the commonest noncyanotic and cyanotic conditions requiring regular follow up with cardiac MRI.
A structured interview was undertaken at the time of initial consultation to confirm Breath holding spells and its type, sex and age at initial spells, laboratory tests, (CBC, EEG, ECG, 2D Echo and neuroimaging studies etc.) were done depending upon the demand of clinical situation to exclude other causes and comorbidities such as epilepsy/ seizures, congenital cyanotic heart diseases, prolonged QT syndrome, Chiari crisis and Brain stem lesions.
Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) is the most common cause of cyanotic congenital heart disease, and Blalock-Taussig shunt (BTS) operation is considered the first-step management for maintaining pulmonary blood flow in TOF patients.
Symptoms of ET can be nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, agitation, hallucinations, lethargy, confusion, painful spasms, seizures, feeble peripheral pulses and cyanotic limbs, loss of peripheral sensation, edema, and gangrene of affected tissues [4].