cyanotrichite


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cyanotrichite

[‚sī·ə′nä·trə‚kīt]
(mineralogy)
Cu4 Al2(SO4)(OH)12·2H2O A bright-blue or sky-blue mineral consisting of a hydrous basic copper aluminum sulfate.
References in periodicals archive ?
At one stroke you have demonstrated that: (1) you know a good specimen when you see one, providing of course, it is a cyanotrichite you have identified and it is indeed a good one; (2) you know more than just the name of the mineral you are looking at and are skillful enough to discern the correct locality by knowing some of the sometimes subtle but positively identifying characteristics of the specimens from that particular occurrence; (3) you know enough about specimens to know how incredibly delicate cyanotrichite is and therefore have not picked it up; and (4) you have paid him a compliment on his good taste.
Perhaps next to the cyanotrichite is an incredible, drool-provoking azurite rose from Bisbee, Arizona that you would murder your grandmother for, which you would like to fondle for a minute or two, even if you could never hope to own anything so fine.
Probably the best specimen of cyanotrichite ever collected was destroyed by persons unknown.
It is surprising to see Fairfield phosphates at this early date, as well as cyanotrichite and brochantite from the Last Chance mine (today known as the Grandview mine) in the Grand Canyon, Arizona.
At Khder, cyanotrichite forms pale blue, in part finely fibrous crusts on vein quartz, with many other secondary copper minerals.
In 2003, a few dealers in Changsha and Guilin offered specimens showing needle-like crystals of a blue mineral thought to be cyanotrichite.
it), also had good Chinese material, in particular some very fine cyanotrichite specimens, with delicate sprays of acicular crystals up to 3 mm on matrix, from Dachang, Guizhou, China.
How about top-quality specimens of leadhillite, cerussite, linarite, turquoise, vanadinite, smithsonite, zunyite, cyanotrichite and hematite?
Cyanotrichite is an incredibly delicate, but beautiful blue mineral that is rarely collected or preserved in an undamaged state.
Fine specimens of spangolite, brochantite, creedite, cyanotrichite, fluorite, linarite, tsumebite and wulfenite have been recovered.
Yet, ask mineral collectors and the words that come to mind when the Grand Canyon is mentioned are cyanotrichite and the Grandview mine.
Lustrous, bladed crystals to 6 mm were found with malachite, brochantite, cyanotrichite and dodecahedral cuprite crystals to 3 mm.