blueprint

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blueprint

blueprint, white-on-blue photographic print, commonly of a working drawing used during building or manufacturing. The plan is first drawn to scale on a special paper or tracing cloth through which light can penetrate. The drawing is then placed over blueprint paper, prepared with a mixture of potassium ferricyanide and ammonium ferric citrate. When the attached drawing and the blueprint paper are exposed to a strong light, the unprotected ferric salt not lying beneath the lines of the drawing is changed to a ferrous salt that reacts with the ferricyanide to form Turnbull's blue. This blue is the background of the finished print. The ferric salt under the lines of the drawing, protected from the light, remains and is dissolved during the washing in water that follows exposure. As a result, the lines of the original drawing appear white in the finished blueprint.
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Blueprint

A reproduction of a drawing by a contact printing process on light-sensitive paper, producing a negative image of white lines on a blue background; refers to architectural working drawings for construction.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

blueprint

[′blü‚print]
(graphic arts)
A contact print, with white lines on a blue background, of a drawing; made on linen or on ferroprussiate paper and developed in water or a special solution.
A photoprint used in offset lithography or photoengraving for use in checking positions of image elements.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

blueprint

a photographic print of plans, technical drawings, etc., consisting of white lines on a blue background
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Balaguer combines fiber craft techniques: loom weaving, embroidery, Saori free style weaving with cyanotypes and photo prints, resulting in exclusive pieces with embedded meanings that explore various human issues.
The cyanotype process uses a combination of chemicals and controlled light exposure to produce a rich, cyan-blue tinted negative effect, like architects' blueprints.
Natural dye, cyanotype and pigment paint on fabric paper; dimensions variable.
Bluecoat, School Lane, 0151 702 5324, - to Sat 13 Aug Introduction to Cyanotype Bluecoat, School Lane, 0151 702 5324, - Sat 13 Aug Introduction to Screenprint All you need to know to get started with screen printing.
Danh uses daguerreotype and cyanotype printing processes, some of the earliest photographic technologies, to render images of the present that themselves recall the past--reconstructed Civil War battlefields, current memorials to wars past, and the faces of twenty-first-century students as they contemplate Whitman's nineteenth-century poetry.
The techniques in question are albumen prints ( which uses the albumen found in egg whites to bind the photographic chemicals to the paper) and cyanotype prints ( which uses two chemicals to produce a simple copy).
The earliest historically, biologist Anna Atkins (1799-1871), worked with cyanotype, "photogenic drawings," with which she became acquainted through Henry Fox Talbot.
Away from painting, Caitriona Dunnett's cyanotype (or cyan-blue print) of Loch Long Torpedo Range (2) shows the inside of a long semiderelict building, the blue giving it a strange appearance.
Similarly, there's a healthy market for photographic prints made with the standard gelatin-silver and color "wet" or "chemical" methods, and even a thriving revival of the earlier alternative processes: platinum, cyanotype, tintype, ambrotype, daguerreotype, each with its own distinctive look and feel.
To this ground, Das Gupta is experimenting with the superimposition of cyanotype photo transfers, or blueprints, of delicate cellular bodies gleaned from husband Sanjay's medical books.