cyanotype


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cyanotype:

see blueprintblueprint,
white-on-blue photographic print, commonly of a working drawing used during building or manufacturing. The plan is first drawn to scale on a special paper or tracing cloth through which light can penetrate.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Balaguer combines fiber craft techniques: loom weaving, embroidery, Saori free style weaving with cyanotypes and photo prints, resulting in exclusive pieces with embedded meanings that explore various human issues.
The cyanotype process uses a combination of chemicals and controlled light exposure to produce a rich, cyan-blue tinted negative effect, like architects' blueprints.
Natural dye, cyanotype and pigment paint on fabric paper; dimensions variable.
Bluecoat, School Lane, 0151 702 5324, - to Sat 13 Aug Introduction to Cyanotype Bluecoat, School Lane, 0151 702 5324, - Sat 13 Aug Introduction to Screenprint All you need to know to get started with screen printing.
Danh uses daguerreotype and cyanotype printing processes, some of the earliest photographic technologies, to render images of the present that themselves recall the past--reconstructed Civil War battlefields, current memorials to wars past, and the faces of twenty-first-century students as they contemplate Whitman's nineteenth-century poetry.
The techniques in question are albumen prints ( which uses the albumen found in egg whites to bind the photographic chemicals to the paper) and cyanotype prints ( which uses two chemicals to produce a simple copy).
The earliest historically, biologist Anna Atkins (1799-1871), worked with cyanotype, "photogenic drawings," with which she became acquainted through Henry Fox Talbot.
Away from painting, Caitriona Dunnett's cyanotype (or cyan-blue print) of Loch Long Torpedo Range (2) shows the inside of a long semiderelict building, the blue giving it a strange appearance.
Similarly, there's a healthy market for photographic prints made with the standard gelatin-silver and color "wet" or "chemical" methods, and even a thriving revival of the earlier alternative processes: platinum, cyanotype, tintype, ambrotype, daguerreotype, each with its own distinctive look and feel.
To this ground, Das Gupta is experimenting with the superimposition of cyanotype photo transfers, or blueprints, of delicate cellular bodies gleaned from husband Sanjay's medical books.