cyberchondria


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cyberchondria

(CYBER hypoCHONDRIA) A condition that people have when they continuously look up medical advice on the Web for every pain and ache. There is so much medical information available, and it is so easy to jump from one article to another that one can easily find a horrid disease for every symptom. See information overload.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cyberchondria has been around for almost a decade, but in the last couple of years, the numbers are growing very rapidly."
On the one hand, having a wealth of health information at our fingertips can mean we're more clued up than ever before - but experts say it's contributing to "cyberchondria".
EVERYONE gets the odd ache and pain now and again, but if you constantly turn to the internet for a diagnosis you could actually be suffering from a type of mental illness - cyberchondria.
Dr Fergus says this growing "cyberchondria" is an obsession that can be harmful.
The literature is inconclusive about the extent of cyberchondria. According to the American Medical Association (AMA), cyberchondria is on the rise ("Cyberchondria: The One Diagnosis Patients Miss," Christine S.
But despite the dubiousness of such apparent mass "cyberchondria", the highly respected Pew Research Centre says phone surveys do not support "the oft expressed fear that patients are using the internet to self-diagnose and self-medicate without reference to medical professionals.
The loss of an almost flawless right calf to a burn mark, two abscesses, and weirdly permanent mosquito bites, as well as the loss of productivity and cheer for almost three weeks because of malaria, paratyphoid C, allergies and respiratory troubles, and another bout of malaria, were more worrisome, not just leaving me with a weaker body but also afflicting me with cyberchondria. But the deepest wound of all, the cause of my frustration today and an almost-permanent pessimism, is the in-your-face inefficiency and everyday corruption.
WHEN you have an unfounded anxiety concerning your health, brought about by your constant visits to medical websites, you could be suffering from cyberchondria.
This, arguably, not only--or not so much--provided relief through knowledge, but, conversely--like today's internet-facilitated 'Cyberchondria' (pp.
As we increasingly turn to PCs rather than GPs for diagnosis, a new trend's been identified: cyberchondria.
Doctors blame the wealth of web-based information for a rise in 'cyberchondria' and claim scores of patients are heeding poor or mistaken advice.