cyberfeminism


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cyberfeminism

the use of images of the cyborg (also see HARAWAY) and CYBERCULTURE to rethink and retheorise gender and sexual identities.
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Among these movements of resistance, which are aimed at breaking editorial barriers, is the so-called cyberfeminism (5).
New Brazilian feminisms and online networks: Cyberfeminism, protest and the female 'Arab Spring.' International Sociology, 32(2), 417-434.
Chapter Seven is primarily focused on the canon of cyberfeminism, exploring and challenging gender stereotypes, and the author engages her ideas well with those who have come before, including Donna Haraway and Sadie Plant and Danielle Citron.
104-129 in Sveningsson Elm, Malin & Sunden, Jenny (eds.) Cyberfeminism in Northern lights.
"Revisiting Cyberfeminism: Theory as a Tool for Understanding Young Women's Experiences." eGirls, eCitizens, edited by Jane Bailey and Valerie Steeves, U of Ottawa P, 2015, pp.
(294.) See HASINOFF, supra note 38, at 157-59; see also Trevor Scott Milford, Revisiting Cyberfeminism: Theory as a Tool for Understanding Young Women's Experiences, in eGirls, eCitizens 65 (Jane Bailey & Valerie Steeves eds., 2015) ("Despite the plethora of constraints and risks articulated in mainstream discourses on gender and virtual expression, girls can also experience agency and liberation through online self-disclosure."); Mae C.
Hershman Leeson's early engagement with cyberfeminism becomes invisible, for example, as does cyberfeminism itself, which plays no part in the show.
Freedman explores a wide range of topics here, including sexism in online gaming, cyberfeminism, blogging, and the easy access of feminist materials and websites.
In Chapter 5, Cunningham and Crandall examine cyberfeminism and suggest continued scrutiny as gender, CE, theory, and pedagogy interact and are shaped by and with technology.
Within TechnoFeminist framework, Wajcman combines Cyberfeminism and Cyborg feminism.
See also Radhika Gajjala and Yeon Ju Oh, eds., Cyberfeminism 2.0 (New York: Peter Lang, 2012).