cyberlibel


Also found in: Dictionary.

cyberlibel

A defamatory remark published on the Internet. Although the libel comments may be sent via email or appear on a blog or website, the preferred venues are social media such as Twitter and Facebook because of their viral potential. See semantic attack and viral.
References in periodicals archive ?
Last month, the NBI said the cyberlibel complaint filed by businessman Wilfredo Keng over an article published in 2012 had no basis.
Under Section 4(c)4 of the assailed law, cyberlibel carries a heavier penalty of jail time of up to 12 years
Sotto said Dayao was the first person against whom he would file a cyberlibel case resulting from that September blog post.
She said she was more inclined to come up with a law increasing the penalties for cyberlibel 'caused by fake news and make public officials and employees, whether elected or appointed, hired as a consultant or adviser, paid or not, criminally liable for posting fake news online where malice is presumed.
The resolution is being used to destroy us,' he said, adding he would bring a cyberlibel case against those behind the blog.
Sotto said he was only being kind because he will only file a cyberlibel case against them, 'otherwise masalubong ko 'to sa daan (if I come across them in the street), I will not be able to help myself.
The affidavits of Dela Rosa and Tolosa were attached to the cyberbullying and cyberlibel complaint filed by Taytayon on Friday in the Pasay City Prosecutor's Office against the Alteas.
Where are you now that actor Robin Padilla and De La Salle University professor Antonio Contreras threaten cyberlibel cases?
Recall the ill-informed #NonLibelousTweet campaign, where Twitter users spread insincere compliments because they believed outright criticism of government would make them liable for cyberlibel.
Since the CPL increased the penalty to a maximum of 10 years, this benefit is denied to cyberlibel offenders.
The recent Supreme Court decision upholding the constitutionality of libel under the Revised Penal Code and under Section 4 C (4) of the cybercrime prevention law but declaring the crimes of aiding and abetting cyberlibel unconstitutional are contradictory rulings, which can only be because of the court's misappreciation of the doctrine of "overbreadth.