cyberpunk


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cyberpunk

/si:'ber-puhnk/ (Originally coined by SF writer Bruce Bethke and/or editor Gardner Dozois) A subgenre of SF launched in 1982 by William Gibson's epoch-making novel "Neuromancer" (though its roots go back through Vernor Vinge's "True Names" to John Brunner's 1975 novel "The Shockwave Rider"). Gibson's near-total ignorance of computers and the present-day hacker culture enabled him to speculate about the role of computers and hackers in the future in ways hackers have since found both irritatingly na"ive and tremendously stimulating. Gibson's work was widely imitated, in particular by the short-lived but innovative "Max Headroom" TV series. See cyberspace, ice, jack in, go flatline.

Since 1990 or so, popular culture has included a movement or fashion trend that calls itself "cyberpunk", associated especially with the rave/techno subculture. Hackers have mixed feelings about this. On the one hand, self-described cyberpunks too often seem to be shallow trendoids in black leather who have substituted enthusiastic blathering about technology for actually learning and *doing* it. Attitude is no substitute for competence. On the other hand, at least cyberpunks are excited about the right things and properly respectful of hacking talent in those who have it. The general consensus is to tolerate them politely in hopes that they'll attract people who grow into being true hackers.

cyberpunk

See CYBERCULTURE.

cyberpunk

A futuristic, online delinquent: breaking into computer systems; surviving by high-tech wits. The term comes from science fiction novels such as "Neuromancer" and "Shockwave Rider." See steampunk.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nao e sem consequencia que Norman Spinrad propoe analisar a ficcao-cientifica cyberpunk pela otica neuromantica.
Cyberpunk draws upon this tradition, with physically tough women and girls who are in control of their urban environments.
Blade Runner not only looks back to Chandler but anticipates cyberpunk. Peter Nicholls's description of Blade Runner's near-future milieu-"mean, drizzling, populous streets lit up by enormous advertisements for Japanese products, alternating street junk with hi-tech" (288)--applies just as readily to the Japanese Chiba City and the urban American "Sprawl" in Neuromancer.
In a reading of cyberpunk fiction's representations of virtual embodiment, Nigel Clark argues that cyberpunk represents cyberspace as a fantasy of escape from embodiment but also, paradoxically, as demanding "a constant attentiveness to the flesh that comes with the capacity to retune the body's signifying surfaces from one moment to the next" (127).
The second central theme of cyberpunk is its conflation of categories; as a genre, it melds disparate elements of cultural dichotomies.
In contrast, second generation cyberpunk offers more exotic and direct forms of interaction.
Some Keanu Reeves fans have also campaigned for the actor to be made Time's person of the year, while others have asked Cyberpunk 2077 developer CD Projekt RED to add a special Reeves achievement to the game.
"The Cyberpunk Nexus: Exploring the Blade Runner Universe" is available in print and on Kindle.
Cyberpunk Science Fiction: Literarische Fiktionen und Medientheorie [Literary Fiction and Media Theory].
Musk described the vehicle as highly-futuristic and "cyberpunk." It's going to look so out of this world that Musk admitted the design might not appeal to everyone and that they might actually come out with a more conventional design. 
The Teesside Cyberpunk Convention's main focus will be on Blade Runner, with Teesside chosen because Scott - brought up and educated in Stockton - used our industrial landscape as inspiration for the film, which is set in a dystopian future Los Angeles of November 2019.
English, film, and other researchers from North America and the UK discuss characters in Star Wars, Mass Effect, Fringe, The 100, Guardians of the Galaxy, Karen Memory, and Westworld, as well as cyberpunk and post-cyberpunk, video games, and fiction by Becky Chambers and Nnedi Okorafor.